A leftist, who made a living out of silencing people with high moral standards, was permanently expelled from the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) on Aug. 17.

Peng Bo was kicked out of the CCP for repressing spiritual believers while, at the same time, participating in mystical activities himself.

The CCP’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection slammed the former deputy director of the “Office of the Leading Group for Prevention and Handling of Xie Jiao (heterodox teachings) Issues,” for entirely unacceptable conduct.

The commission accused Peng of betraying the CCP through engaging in “superstitious activities,” visiting “private clubs,” and joining “public banquets.” His other crimes included deviating from CCP Central Committee decisions, openly expressing his opinions, and defying “organizational censorship.” He also allegedly abused his power for personal profit and to buy several properties.

Peng has already been stripped of his pay and benefits. This rather public expulsion represents a major fall from grace for the bureaucrat, who faces criminal prosecution and even jail time.

He was responsible for censoring internet content that fails to comply with communist ideology across mainland China. He also “prevented” and “handled” underground Christians, Tibetan Buddhists, Uighur native people, Falun Gong adherents, and other so-called threats to CCP rule.

BL understands this would involve arbitrarily arresting, detaining, torturing, organ harvesting, and killing people for behaving honestly, kindly, and patiently in daily life.

One central anti-xie-jiao office employee believes Peng is a classic example of perpetrators becoming too interested in the very spiritual teachings they repress.

“Many of these bureaucrats by fighting ‘superstition’ get interested in it, and start asking themselves, ‘What if these things worked?'” the anonymous worker said according to Bitter Winter. “They would certainly not join Falun Gong but would start collecting books about qigong, feng shui, or divination–and perhaps visit, and even protect some esoteric master.”

The CCP wants to tighten internet controls further and identify and arrest anyone who spreads spiritual content online.

The Taipei Times reported Beijing heavily censors non-CCP aligned content on the internet and social networks. This includes content that expresses views about the non-material world or questions the party’s and state-run media’s version of history and current affairs.

So-called deviant posts must be deleted immediately, and any insults towards the CCP may result in criminal prosecution.