Tens of thousands of people gathered in downtown Hong Kong to ask the international community, and particularly the United States, to help stop the interference of the Chinese communist regime in the semi-autonomous territory, reported DW Akademie.

In the first of the gatherings authorized by the police—since the entry into force of the emergency laws of the colonial era—Hong Kongers urged U.S. representatives to vote in favor of a law that would sanction possible abuses by the Chinese Communist Party.

The House proposed to study a bill this week, called the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, to investigate the numerous allegations of human rights violations and political interference in this special administrative region.

The draft provides for an annual review of the situation in Hong Kong, based on its trade relations with the United States as well as the implementation of possible sanctions against Chinese leaders.

 “Police state”

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) one of the promoters of the bill, warned after his recent visit to the former British colony that Hong Kong seems to be becoming a “police state.”

 “The situation here is critical,” Hawley said. “The principle ‘One country, two systems’ is in danger,” he concluded at the end of his visit to Hong Kong, where he met with some pro-democracy activists and attended a demonstration in the Mongkok neighborhood.

Demonstrators in Hong Kong ask the U.S. for help by flying its flag and lighting flashlights during a peaceful demonstration in Hong Kong's downtown business district on Oct. 14, 2019 (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Demonstrators in Hong Kong ask the United States for help by flying its flag and lighting flashlights during a peaceful demonstration in Hong Kong’s downtown business district on Oct. 14, 2019 (Felipe Dana/AP Photo)

The principle of “One country, two systems” gave Hong Kongers until 2047 freedoms that do not exist in the rest of communist China. However, the pro-democracy demonstrators who lead the protests decry the Chinese regime not respecting such an agreement and accuse it of meddling in the affairs of the region.

On the other hand, Chief Executive Carrie Lamb, who provoked widespread anger when she banned the use of face masks on Oct. 4, suggested that she plans to impose new measures to quell the anti-government protests that brought 2 million citizens to the streets of Hong Kong, described The Guardian.