When soldiers massacred as many as 300 people at a student protest in Mexico City’s Tlatelolco plaza on Oct. 2, 1968, the killers wore uniforms. Today, students in Mexico say they are still under attack, but now from thugs, drug cartels, paramilitaries or rapists.

In this Sept. 18, 2018 photo, Enrique Espinosa points to a himself in a photo from a magazine where he and other demonstrators are detained after being stripped to their underwear by armed soldiers during the Tlatelolco massacre 50 years ago in Mexico City. “We are possibly worse off today. Young people are under attack, with the economy, inequality, there are fewer opportunities,” said Espinosa. “This is not the Mexico we wanted.” (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
In this Sept. 18, 2018 photo, Enrique Espinosa demonstrates the pose he took at the spot where he and other demonstrators were detained by armed soldiers during the Tlatelolco massacre 50 years ago in Mexico City. Today’s student activists and even the graying veterans of the 1968 democracy movement acknowledge they now have free speech, something the ’68 generation fought for. But the impunity remains the same; nobody was ever convicted for the 1968 killings. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
In this Sept. 18, 2018 photo, Enrique Espinosa shows his old student identification card from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM, in Mexico City. Espinosa was a medical student at the time he survived the 1968 Tlateloco massacre in Tlatelolco plaza 50 years ago. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
In this Sept. 18, 2018 photo, Enrique Espinosa, who was a medical student when he survived the 1968 Tlateloco massacre, shows the spot where he was when soldiers started shooting in Tlatelolco plaza, Mexico City. Nobody knows exactly how many died when soldiers opened fire on a peaceful demonstration 50 years ago. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

Today’s student activists — and even the graying veterans of the 1968 democracy movement — acknowledge they now have free speech, something the ’68 generation fought for. But they say the impunity remains the same; nobody was ever convicted for the 1968 killings.

FILE – In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, students chant with the Spanish sign “Porros get out of UNAM,” outside the rector’s office at Mexico’s National Autonomous University, UNAM, as they demand an end to violence by thugs known as “porros” at the university’s main campus in Mexico City. When soldiers massacred as many as 300 people at a student protest in Mexico City’s Tlatelolco plaza 50 years ago on Oct. 2, 1968, the killers wore uniforms. Today, students in Mexico say they are still under attack, but now from thugs, drug cartels, paramilitaries or rapists. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)
FILE – In this Oct. 22, 2014 file photo, people protest the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico City. With the exception of a few charred bone fragments, nobody has ever found the bodies of 43 students at a rural teachers’ college who were kidnapped by police and turned over to a drug gang in Sept. 2014. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, File)
FILE – In this Oct. 3, 1968 file photo, armored cars are lined up on the Plaza of the Three Cultures in Mexico City, after fierce clashes the previous night between Mexican forces and striking students. As Mexico marks the 50-year anniversary of Tlatelolco, the massacre remains something of an open wound: Nobody knows exactly how many died when soldiers opened fire on a peaceful demonstration, and it wasn’t until 2018 that a government agency acknowledged for the first time that it was “a state crime.” (AP Photo, File)
File – In this Oct. 3, 1968 file photo, soldiers cut a student’s hair as they arrest him during the Tlatelolco massacre in Mexico City. In 1968, students struggled to print up and distribute leaflets and fought the indifference or lies of government-aligned media; the day after the 1968 massacre, newspapers depicted it as an attack on soldiers, with headlines like “Terrorists and soldiers fought a tough battle” and “Criminal provocation causes bloody confrontation.” (AP Photo, File)
FILE – In this Oct. 3, 1968 file photo, Mexican soldiers guard a group of young men rounded up after the night that came to be known as the “Tlatelolco massacre” in the Plaza of the Three Cultures area of Mexico City. Despite the governmental Victims’ Commission’s recent acknowledgement of the massacre as a “state crime that continued beyond Oct. 2 with arbitrary arrests and torture” and a pledge for reparations, justice remains elusive. (AP Photo, File)

As Mexico marks the 50-year anniversary of Tlatelolco on Tuesday, the massacre remains something of an open wound: Nobody knows exactly how many died when soldiers opened fire on a peaceful demonstration.

Source: The Associated Press

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