Navy divers interviewed on Indonesian television say they’ve recovered the crashed Lion Air jet’s flight recorder from the sea floor.

TV stations on Thursday showed images of the device which was transferred from an inflatable vessel to a ship in a large white container.

Members of National Search and Rescue Agency inspect debris retrieved from the waters where Lion Air flight JT 610 is believed to have crashed, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. A massive search effort has identified the possible seabed location of the crashed Lion Air jet, Indonesia's military chief said Wednesday, as experts carried out the grim task of identifying dozens of body parts recovered from a 15-nautical-mile-wide search area. (AP Photo/Fauzy Chaniago)
Members of National Search and Rescue Agency inspect debris retrieved from the waters where Lion Air flight JT 610 is believed to have crashed, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. A massive search effort has identified the possible seabed location of the crashed Lion Air jet, Indonesia’s military chief said Wednesday, as experts carried out the grim task of identifying dozens of body parts recovered from a 15-nautical-mile-wide search area. (AP Photo/Fauzy Chaniago)

Two navy divers described finding the device and bringing it to the surface. One said the fuselage of the plane was also seen.

An Indonesian soldiers walk past debris retrieved from the waters where Lion Air flight JT 610 is believed to have crashed at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. A massive search effort has identified the possible seabed location of the crashed Lion Air jet, Indonesia's military chief said Wednesday, as experts carried out the grim task of identifying dozens of body parts recovered from a 15-nautical-mile-wide search area. (AP Photo/Fauzy Chaniago)
An Indonesian soldiers walk past debris retrieved from the waters where Lion Air flight JT 610 is believed to have crashed at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. A massive search effort has identified the possible seabed location of the crashed Lion Air jet, Indonesia’s military chief said Wednesday, as experts carried out the grim task of identifying dozens of body parts recovered from a 15-nautical-mile-wide search area. (AP Photo/Fauzy Chaniago)

The Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane crashed Monday just minutes after takeoff from Jakarta, killing all 189 people on board.

Source: The Associated Press

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