The European Union is planning how to intervene in the Hong Kong issue after the new security law was passed affecting the freedoms of Hong Kong citizens.

The South China Morning Post had access to an EU draft that proposes export controls on Hong Kong, migration reviews, visas and asylum for citizens persecuted by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). 

The South China Morning Post said the document is less comprehensive than the U.S. response, but condemned Hong Kong’s national security law “as an issue of grave concern.”

The draft document was agreed to on Thursday, July 23, by the Council of the European Union, describing a package of measures to be carried out in response to the new security law on Hong Kong by the CCP. According to the South China Morning Post, the document will be ready for official promulgation next week.

 The EU is organizing to restrict the sale of products that could somehow be used to suppress or monitor society.

 The paper refers to the new law as a serious matter for failing to comply with international treaties and commitments taken by the CCP when it rejoined the economic world after 1970. And specifically with the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984 or with the Basic Law of Hong Kong.

 According to the report, this lack of compliance with legal commitments could affect the relationship between the Chinese Communist Party and the European Union, but, at least so far, there is no concrete and direct action against the regime or officials involved. 

 Although the EU Council proposed not to open new negotiations with Hong Kong, the actions taken would, for the time being, be much less radical than those taken by the United States at the end of June. 

 Following the same analysis, Reinhard Buetikofer, a member of the European Parliament who oversees China’s affairs, described the EU plan as timid for not proposing any concrete action against the CCP.

 “The proposals on the table are signaling on one hand that the EU has understood that just words would not be enough, but it’s still not united enough to take action commensurate to the problem at hand,” he told the South China Morning Post. 

 “[That] none of the action will have an impact on the PRC [the CCP] is a timid approach. I’m convinced the EU has to muster the courage to tell Beijing that ignoring international law will come with an economic price,” Buetikofer added.

 In parallel, last Friday, representatives of the EU and the CCP met to continue negotiating a bilateral investment treaty. So far, after 31 meetings, there are no clear public definitions on the subject.

 Great Britain recently took a series of unilateral decisions that directly harm its relations with the CCP:

  •  It banned the Chinese company Huawei from developing the controversial 5G network on its territory 
  • They publicly condemned the unfulfilled promises of the CCP on the Sino-British treaty
  • It opened the door to thousands of Hong Kong people fleeing their country after the imposition of the new security law by the CCP
  • It suspended its extradition treaty with Hong Kong 
  • It extended its arms embargo on the CCP to Hong Kong

 Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo recently congratulated the British government for standing up to the CCP, and even encouraged it to be even tougher if necessary.

He was clear in his speech on the importance of creating a global coalition that understands the threat posed by the Chinese Communist Party, and which in turn works collectively to change the Party’s hostile behavior and counteract its power. 

“[That] none of the action will have an impact on the PRC [CCP] is a timid approach. I’m convinced the EU has to muster the courage to tell Beijing that ignoring international law will come with an economic price,” Buetikofer added.