On Sunday, October 25, hundreds of demonstrators gathered in Taipei, the capital of Taiwan, to protest the arbitrary detention of 12 Hong Kong pro-democracy activists by Chinese regime authorities as they attempted to flee to Taiwan last August.

Reuters reported that the protests were presented as a global campaign in support of the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong, which has been repressed by the authorities of the Special Administrative Region following the imposition of the controversial national security law from mainland China.

The controversial law punishes those who are involved in separatist actions or who are accused of colluding with foreign countries, as well as terrorism and subversion.

A protester holds a “Free Hong Kong revolution” flag during a rally in Taipei, Taiwan, on Oct. 25, 2020, calling on the Chinese Communist Party to release 12 Hong Kong people arrested at sea by mainland authorities. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

Many Hong Kong activists have considered moving to Taiwan since the controversial law took effect in the city.

Taiwan and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) separated when the 1949 civil war took place and currently do not have diplomatic relations due to constant pressure and threats from the CCP to reunify the island into the one-country, two-systems policy, a position that has been strongly rejected by President Tsai Ing-Wen and her democratic vision for Taiwan.

Tsai Cheung-Kui, a protester who managed to move to the island in February said that for him it was important to demonstrate as a Hong Konger. “Those of us Hong Kongers in Taiwan want to come to support them” he said. “It’s very obvious, Hong Kong is no longer Hong Kong. But we haven’t given up on Hong Kong,” according to Global News.

A protester holds a “Free Hong Kong revolution” flag during a rally in Taipei, Taiwan, on Oct. 25, 2020, calling on the Chinese Communist Party to release 12 Hong Kong people arrested at sea by mainland authorities. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

According to the Hong Kong security bureau, the 12 detainees were suspected of committing crimes that include making or possessing explosives, arson, and rioting in Hong Kong.

Several of the protesters present at the rally wore black T-shirts and some displayed signs demanding the immediate release of the detained youth while others carried yellow umbrellas representing Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement, according to Reuters.

One of the protesters identified as Roger, who participated in the Hong Kong demonstrations and fled to Taiwan last year, said, “We want the Chinese Communist Party to know the entire world is paying attention to the 12 people so that they can’t act unjustly.”

The demonstration is part of a global campaign that took place in 35 cities around the world.

As Global News pointed out, on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday in cities such as New York, Vancouver, and Adelaide, Australia, they showed their solidarity with those kidnapped in the campaign called #save12hkyouths.

Also, well-known Hong Kong pro-democracy activists like Joshua Wong and Nathan Law helped launch the campaign on social networks.

Meanwhile, Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam indicated that the young people detained between the ages of 16 and 33 will have to face justice on the mainland, assuring that their government will provide them with “necessary” and “feasible” assistance.