The leader of the Chinese Communist Party, Xi Jinping, gave a virtual speech on Thursday, Oct. 1, at the U.N. that was very well received by feminist organizations, in which he defended women’s rights. At the same time, reports indicate that in northwest China, specifically in the area of Xinjiang, the largest genocide by abortion and forced sterilization in contemporary history is taking place. 

Once again the double standard of communism can be observed. On the one hand, its leaders speak of rights, social justice, development, and freedoms, while in practice only human rights abuses, poverty, and stagnation become increasingly evident. 

In his virtual speech to the U.N., Xi focused on the ideology of gender equality. He targeted all public and private institutions, calling for strong action against violations of women’s rights and interests. Paradoxically, he spoke of “improving social services, giving priority to special groups such as pregnant and postpartum women.”

At one point in the speech, Xi spoke directly to the U.N. suggesting that the institution “should do more to eliminate violence, discrimination, poverty, and other old problems.”

Xi’s calls to end violence against women and protect their rights to maternal health care sound truly provocative when compared to reports and allegations about the horrific conditions Uighur women face while detained in state-run concentration camps in Xinjiang.

German anthropologist Adrian Zenz is leading the investigations and allegations against the CCP on behalf of Uighur minorities. In his last report he detailed with abundant proof that for decades there have been practices by the Chinese Communist Party to slowly eradicate the Uighur and Turkish population in the area of East Turkistan. Since 2016, forced sterilization practices have reportedly increased considerably.

The practices denounced in the report, implemented by the Chinese Communist Party, aim at forcibly suppressing the birth rates of the Uyghur community, including the mass application of compulsory contraception, sterilizations, and forced abortions.

Between 1979 and 2009, according to the government of Turkistan in exile, the CCP admitted that it “prevented the illegal births of 3.7 million babies” in eastern Turkistan alone.

Zenz’s report also states that more than 3 million Uighurs, Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Uzbeks, Tatars, and other Turkish peoples in East Turkistan have been locked up in concentration camps and forced labor camps. More than 500,000 Uighurs and other Turkish children have been forcibly separated from their mothers and are being indoctrinated in state orphanages and boarding schools to become “loyal Chinese citizens.”

The details of the report really make one suppose that reality surpasses fiction. It includes torture by electrocution, sexual abuse, forced eating of pork, and drinking of alcohol (acts of extreme humiliation for Muslims), and is followed by a long list of atrocities. 

Despite these denunciations, Xi is foolish enough to call on the U.N. and world authorities to “fight for women’s rights.”