As the outlook for coral reefs across a warming planet grows grimmer, scientists in Israel have discovered a rare glimmer of hope: The corals of the northern Red Sea may survive, and even thrive, into the next century.

The carbon dioxide that humans pump into the atmosphere spikes the temperature and acidity of seawater, which both poisons the marine invertebrates and hampers their growth at alarming rates. Experts estimate that half of the corals that existed in the early 20th century have died.

But the corals at the northernmost tip of the Red Sea are exhibiting remarkable resistance to the rising water temperatures and acidification. Experts hope the lessons learned there can help coral reefs elsewhere in the world.

In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Maoz Fine, coral reef expert at Bar-Ilan University in Israel comes out of the water after a research dive in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Maoz Fine, coral reef expert at Bar-Ilan University in Israel comes out of the water after a research dive in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
This Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, shows a diver's view of the Red Sea with a marine observatory in the distance, in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
This Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, shows a diver’s view of the Red Sea with a marine observatory in the distance, in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, healthy corals are exhibited at the marine observatory in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, healthy corals are exhibited at the marine observatory in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
This Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, provided by the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, shows corals at the institute's coral farm in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences/Dror Komet via AP)
This Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, provided by the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, shows corals at the institute’s coral farm in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences/Dror Komet via AP)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, a researcher examines coral at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, a researcher examines coral at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
This Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, provided by the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, shows corals at the institute's coral farm in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences/Dror Komet via AP)
This Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, provided by the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, shows corals at the institute’s coral farm in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences/Dror Komet via AP)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Maoz Fine, an expert on coral reefs at Bar-Ilan University, measures the water temperature of tanks treated to simulate future climate change conditions in a lab in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Maoz Fine, an expert on coral reefs at Bar-Ilan University, measures the water temperature of tanks treated to simulate future climate change conditions in a lab in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Jessica Bellworthy, coral researcher at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, examines coral in tanks treated to simulate future climate change conditions in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
In this Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 photo, Jessica Bellworthy, coral researcher at the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences, IUI, examines coral in tanks treated to simulate future climate change conditions in the Red Sea city of Eilat, southern Israel. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)