-U.S. sends humanitarian aid to Venezuela

- López Obrador accuses former President Calderón of influence trafficking and corruption

- Brazil proposes to remove gender ideology and politics from schools

- Colombia's president to meet with Donald Trump

U.S. sends humanitarian aid to Venezuela

The United States is now sending humanitarian aid to Venezuela.
Food, medicine, and clothing are headed to the Colombian city of Cúcuta, where they will be stored awaiting entry into Venezuela.
The United States, which leads the international campaign to recognize Juan Guaidó as president of Venezuela, is trying to increase the pressure on Nicolás Maduro.
Maduro refuses to receive aid and seeks financing by selling gold to neutral Uruguay, in an attempt to avoid the international economic blockade.
Guaidó said the aid will enter Venezuela through three different points, and that a meeting of international donors is scheduled to take place in Washington on February 14.
The interim president reiterated his call to the Armed Forces, the main pillar of Maduro's regime, to allow the entry of food and support a peaceful transition of government.

López Obrador accuses former President Calderón of influence trafficking and corruption

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador accused former President Felipe Calderón of influence peddling and corruption.

He indicated that Calderón, after finishing his presidential term, became part of the board of directors of a foreign company that sold energy to the nation.
He also pointed out that the same company had signed large contracts with the government when Calderón was in office.
Likewise, López Obrador extended the accusation to the members of the Secretariat of Energy, whom he denounced for corruption.

Brazil proposes to remove gender ideology and politics from schools

The government of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro proposes to end Marxist indoctrination and gender ideology in the classroom.

The bill, called School Without Party, argues that parents have the right to educate their children according to their own moral convictions, without state intervention.
The authorities indicated that the regulations will combat gender or sexological practices, which despite not being legal or constitutional, try to take over the global education system.
they pointed out that they seek to put an end to all discourses and school material of a political, ideological and moral nature, which violates the freedom of conscience of the student.
The School Without Party project, created in 2004 by Sao Paulo's attorney general, Miguel Nagib, will have to be validated by a special commission before going to Congress for approval.

Colombia's president to meet with Donald Trump

Colombian President Iván Duque will meet in Washington in mid-February with his U.S. counterpart, President Donald Trump, to discuss the situation in Venezuela.
The meeting will follow the recent agreement to join forces to overthrow the socialist government of Nicolás Maduro.
They will also deal with other issues such as the fight against drug trafficking, coca cultivation, transnational organized crime, and corruption.
Duque, who will visit the United States from 12 to 15 February, will also meet with parliamentarians, businessmen, and representatives of international organizations such as the UN and the OAS.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://goo.gl/jHqzVd 
Subscribe to our Twitter page: https://goo.gl/Stnu74