The Tennessee Valley Authority says river levels in its expansive network of waterways are starting to recede, but flood-stricken residents should not exhale just yet as TVA continues to release water from dams and forecasters predict more rain in the coming days.

TVA River Forecast Center manager James Everett says river levels have slowly begun to come down in northern Alabama and western Tennessee, which saw 10 to 13 inches (25 to 33 centimeters) of rain last week. That’s two to three times the normal rainfall for February.

The drenching led to homes, roads, businesses and farms being flooded in Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi and Alabama, where saturated land and bulging rivers led to water rescues and caused landslides and sinkholes. Officials said the recovery process could take a few weeks.

A backyard on Pryor Road in Limestone County is flooded on Friday, Feb. 22, 2019, in Decatur, Ala. More than 30 school districts in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee closed Friday, in part because school buses couldn't navigate flooded roads. (Jeronimo Nisa/The Decatur Daily via AP)
A backyard on Pryor Road in Limestone County is flooded on Friday, Feb. 22, 2019, in Decatur, Ala. More than 30 school districts in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee closed Friday, in part because school buses couldn’t navigate flooded roads. (Jeronimo Nisa/The Decatur Daily via AP)