The Latest on John Walker Lindh’s release from prison (all times local):

10:00 a.m.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the early release of John Walker Lindh from federal prison is “unexplainable and unconscionable.”

FILE - American John Walker Lindh is seen in this undated file photo obtained Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2002, from a religious school where he studied for five months in Bannu, 304 kilometers (190 miles) southwest of Islamabad, Pakistan. Lindh, the young Californian who became known as the American Taliban after he was captured by U.S. forces in the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, is set to go free Thursday, May 23, 2019, after nearly two decades in prison. (AP Photo, File)
FILE – American John Walker Lindh is seen in this undated file photo obtained Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2002, from a religious school where he studied for five months in Bannu, 304 kilometers (190 miles) southwest of Islamabad, Pakistan. Lindh, the young Californian who became known as the American Taliban after he was captured by U.S. forces in the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, is set to go free Thursday, May 23, 2019, after nearly two decades in prison. (AP Photo, File)

Lindh was released Thursday from a facility in Indiana, having served 17 years of a 20-year sentence.

Pompeo told “Fox and Friends” that the so-called “American Taliban” continues to pose a threat. He called for a review of the prison system’s early release policies.

The young man from Northern California had joined the Taliban and was with them in Afghanistan during the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Lindh also was there when a group of Taliban prisoners rose up and killed CIA officer Johnny Micheal “Mike” Spann.

Lindh struck a plea bargain in which he admitted to illegally providing support to the Taliban but denied a role in Spann’s death.

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2 a.m.

The California man who became known as the “American Taliban” after his capture on an Afghanistan battlefield in late 2001 is on the cusp of release from prison.

Thirty-eight-year-old John Walker Lindh is scheduled for release Thursday from the federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. He has spent more than 17 years in prison after pleading guilty to providing support to the Taliban.

The plea deal called for a 20-year sentence, but Lindh is getting out a few years early for good behavior.

His release is opposed by the family of Mike Spann. He was killed in Afghanistan during an uprising of Taliban prisoners. Spann had interrogated Lindh shortly before the attack.

A judge recently imposed additional restrictions on Lindh’s post-release supervision, including monitoring of his internet use.