The Latest on the Alaska earthquake (all times local):

9:45 a.m.

A dump truck and excavator work on a temporary fix of an off ramp that collapsed after an earthquake on Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, in Anchorage, Alaska. A driver attempting to exit Minnesota Drive at International Airport Road was not injured when the ramp sank. Two strong earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 ripped apart highways, cracked buildings and rattled people's nerves around Anchorage. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
A dump truck and excavator work on a temporary fix of an off ramp that collapsed after an earthquake on Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, in Anchorage, Alaska. A driver attempting to exit Minnesota Drive at International Airport Road was not injured when the ramp sank. Two strong earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 ripped apart highways, cracked buildings and rattled people’s nerves around Anchorage. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)

The federal courthouse in Anchorage remains without heat and closed Monday, days after the powerful earthquake rocked a wide swath of Alaska.

Officials announced the U.S. District Court and attached federal building in Anchorage will be closed at least through Thursday following a preliminary evaluation by the General Services Administration.

This aerial photo shows damage at the Glenn Highway near Mirror Lake after earthquakes in the Anchorage area, Alaska, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. Back-to-back earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 shattered highways and rocked buildings Friday in Anchorage and the surrounding area, sending people running into the streets and briefly triggering a tsunami warning for islands and coastal areas south of the city. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)
This aerial photo shows damage at the Glenn Highway near Mirror Lake after earthquakes in the Anchorage area, Alaska, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. Back-to-back earthquakes measuring 7.0 and 5.7 shattered highways and rocked buildings Friday in Anchorage and the surrounding area, sending people running into the streets and briefly triggering a tsunami warning for islands and coastal areas south of the city. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP)

The 7.0 earthquake that struck Friday 7 miles (11 kilometers) north of Anchorage rattled buildings, disrupted power and caused heavy damage to the only highway that goes north of the city.

Hundreds of aftershocks since have frayed the nerves of quake-weary Alaskans.

This Friday, Nov. 30, 2018 photo provided by Alaska Railroad Corp. shows damage from a magnitude 7.0 earthquake by Nancy Lake, near Willow, Alaska. The railroad will use heavy equipment to repair the damage before it can resume train traffic between Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska's two largest cities. (Lloyd Tesch/Alaska Railroad Corp. via AP)
This Friday, Nov. 30, 2018 photo provided by Alaska Railroad Corp. shows damage from a magnitude 7.0 earthquake by Nancy Lake, near Willow, Alaska. The railroad will use heavy equipment to repair the damage before it can resume train traffic between Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska’s two largest cities. (Lloyd Tesch/Alaska Railroad Corp. via AP)

GSA spokesman Chad Hutson said Monday boilers in the federal building are leaking, leaving it without heat.

The nearby Historic Federal Building, where the bankruptcy court is located, also is closed. Officials say it is ready for reopening once minor cleanup is complete.

Anchorage resident C.J. Johnson stocks up on water and bread at a local grocery, after the morning's 7.0-magnitude earthquake which caused extensive damage to the local area in Anchorage, Alaska, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. The earthquake that shook Anchorage and damaged roadways also knocked many traffic lights out of service and has snarled traffic. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen)
Anchorage resident C.J. Johnson stocks up on water and bread at a local grocery, after the morning’s 7.0-magnitude earthquake which caused extensive damage to the local area in Anchorage, Alaska, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. The earthquake that shook Anchorage and damaged roadways also knocked many traffic lights out of service and has snarled traffic. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen)

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12 a.m.

A nearly empty produce bin for bananas is shown at a grocery store in Anchorage, Alaska, on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018, two days after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake was centered about 7 miles north of the city. Anchorage officials urged residents not to stock up and hoard supplies because the supply chain of goods was not interrupted. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
A nearly empty produce bin for bananas is shown at a grocery store in Anchorage, Alaska, on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018, two days after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake was centered about 7 miles north of the city. Anchorage officials urged residents not to stock up and hoard supplies because the supply chain of goods was not interrupted. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

The supply chain of food and other goods delivered to the Port of Anchorage from the Lower 48 has not been disrupted by the powerful earthquake that caused widespread damage to roads in the Anchorage area.

“The ships are coming in on schedule, the supply lines are at this point uninterrupted,” Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz said Sunday at a news conference.

Empty shelves where bread is normally located are shown at a grocery store in Anchorage, Alaska, on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018, two days after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake was centered about 7 miles north of the city. Anchorage officials urged residents not to stock up and hoard supplies because the supply chain of goods was not interrupted. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
Empty shelves where bread is normally located are shown at a grocery store in Anchorage, Alaska, on Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018, two days after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake was centered about 7 miles north of the city. Anchorage officials urged residents not to stock up and hoard supplies because the supply chain of goods was not interrupted. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

The magnitude 7.0 earthquake rattled the state’s largest city early Friday morning swaying buildings and fraying nerves. There were no reports of deaths, serious injuries or structural damage to buildings.

Roads, however, took the brunt of the damage, especially the scenic Glenn Highway, the closest thing Alaska has to an interstate and links the state’s largest city to suburban communities to the north.

Source: The Associated Press

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