As he begins the sequel to his stormy U.N. debut, President Donald Trump will again confront the dangers posed by North Korea’s nuclear threat, though its shadow may appear somewhat less ominous than a year ago.

FILE – In this Sept. 21, 2017 file photo, U.S. United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley address the United Nations Security Council, during the U.N. General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters. Haley has told reporters that Trump, who champions an “America First” policy, wants to talk about “protecting U.S. sovereignty,” and she reiterated that the United States opposes the 2015 Paris climate agreement to curb global warming a newly agreed international compact aimed at regulating migration. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Twelve months after Trump stood at the rostrum of the U.N. General Assembly and derided North Korea’s Kim Jong Un as “Rocket Man,” the push to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula is a work in progress, although fears of war have given way to dreams of rapprochement.

FILE – In this July 20, 2018 file photo, U. S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to reporters at United Nations headquarters. Pompeo will preside over the second meeting Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018, on North Korea, an issue the Security Council was united on in imposing increasingly tough sanctions. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

The president, whose bellicose denunciations of Pyongyang have largely given way to hopeful notes, plans to sit down with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who comes bearing a personal message to Trump from North Korea’s Kim after their inter-Korean talks last week.

Source: The Associated Press

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