Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) praised President Donald Trump’s speech addressing the protests and riots that have broken out across the nation in the wake of George Floyd’s death, saying it was “powerful” and “necessary.”

“I would say that the president’s comments in the Rose Garden were important. They were significant. They were heartfelt. I think they lead us in the right direction,” Scott said during a Fox News interview Monday. “We need to hear more like that from the president because, frankly, the country rallies around our chief executive when he speaks about bringing the American family together.”

“So, I thought what he said in the Rose Garden was important, it was powerful, and it was necessary,” he added.

President Trump earlier in the day said during a statement in the Rose Garden that his first and highest duty as president is “to defend our great country and the American people,” vowing to uphold the laws of the nation. 

“All Americans were rightly sickened and revolted by the brutal death of George Floyd. My administration is fully committed that for George and his family, justice will be served. He will not have died in vain,” the president said. 

The president also said he is taking “immediate action” to mobilize “all available federal resources” to stop riots and looting across the country and threatened to deploy the military if states don’t take actions.

“America needs creation not destruction, cooperation not contempt, security not anarchy, healing not hatred, justice not chaos,” he said. “We must never give in to anger or hatred if malice or violence rains, then none of us is free.”

Former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley also commended President Trump’s remarks, saying that it’s “hugely important” for the country during such time.

“This speech by the president is hugely important right now. America needs to hear compassion, strength, actions that will be taken, and a way to unite going forward,” Haley tweeted.

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died Monday, May 25, after being arrested by Minneapolis police officers, prompting demonstrations nationwide, some of which have turned into violence with rioting and looting in several cities since Wednesday. Four officers were fired after the arrest. Derek Chauvin, who forced Floyd down onto ground by pressing his knee into Floyd’s neck, has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.