Three of the 10 largest wildfires in California’s history are currently active, according to Cal Fire. More than 585 fires have torched 771,000 acres, and almost 12,000 firefighters are working to keep the fires under control.

The conflagration includes multiple fires caused by lightning storms in Napa, Sonoma, Lake, Yolo, and Solano counties.

So far, six people have died in the fires, four others have been injured, and 700 structures have been destroyed.

According to Fox News, there are 24 tankers, 88 helicopters, and over 1,000 fire trucks working in the area.

State firefighters reported that of the six people killed, four were civilians, and two were rescue and firefighting personnel. Also, tens of thousands of people had to leave their homes and go to emergency shelters.

Smoke covers the landscape in this satellite image of the CZU Lightning Complex wildfire over Santa Cruz, Calif., on Aug. 21, 2020. (Maxar Technologies/Handout via Reuters)

Across the state, many of the fires were caused by lightning strikes. Some fires were small and remote, but most of the damage was caused by three groups of fires that were devastating forests and rural areas in the San Francisco Bay Area and the wine region north of San Francisco.

According to Fox News, there are 24 tankers, 88 helicopters, and over 1,000 fire trucks working in the area. State firefighters reported that of the six people killed, four were civilians, and two were rescue and firefighting personnel. Also, tens of thousands of people had to leave their homes and go to emergency shelters.

Two Bay Area clusters became the second and third largest wildfires in the state’s recent history by size, according to state fire records. Teams from neighboring states, including Oregon, Idaho, and Arizona, arrived to help control the spread, according to Daniel Berlant, deputy assistant director of Cal Fire.

Light winds, colder and wetter nighttime weather, and the arrival of more firefighting equipment, plus cooperation from neighboring states, helped make significant progress in fighting three of Northern California’s massive fire hotspots.

But Thom Porter, the head of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, tweeted a few hours ago: “Day 7. The worst is not behind us, we are in a battle rhythm. New lightning activity is expected across the state. Double your efforts to look out for yourselves and each other! EVERYONE, head on a swivel. WE’VE GOT THIS! “

Unfortunately, the weather forecast for the next few days threatens to overwhelm firefighting efforts. More dry, warm winds are expected for the rest of the weekend with gusts of up to 65 mph, accompanied by lightning. The National Weather Service issued a fire alert from Sunday through Tuesday.