A man identified as Andre Taylor, convicted of running prostitutes for his own profit, signed a $150,000 a year contract with the Seattle city government to advise on police reform, among other things, The Post Millennial reported. 

According to the Las Vegas Sun, Taylor was sentenced to five and a half years for seven prostitution-related crimes, three involving a 16-year-old girl, two related to adult women who also traveled with him, and two charges of money laundering.

Two of Taylor’s prostitutes told the jury about the world of prostitution. They said they worked seven days a week and gave all their earnings to Taylor, who lived in a $300,000 house and wore $4,000 Versace suits and a $90,000 Rolex watch.

In the video, Taylor said he was born on the streets and came from deep darkness. He also mentions that he had children with the prostitutes he controlled. “We didn’t care what you thought about us … just like I don’t care what you think about me now,” he said.

In 2016, Taylor created the group “Not This Time”, an organization allegedly to combat police violence after his brother Che Taylor was shot dead by police.

According to the Post Millennial report, Mr. Che was fatally shot by police during an attempted arrest for drug possession. Police were cleared of all charges after finding that Che was armed at the time of the altercation.

Taylor’s brother had previously been convicted of robbery and rape.

With the Not This Time group’s creation, Andre became a ‘civic activist’ for the Seattle government and, in 2019, received $100,000 from the municipality to hold an event called “Conversation with the Street.”

Taylor was one of CHAZ’s organizers, also known as the “Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone,” and told the protesters that they had to demand $2 million from the city to end their occupation. The police finally dismantled the CHAZ zone in early July after two murders were reported there.

Taylor was involved in the closed meetings where Mayor Durkan allegedly negotiated payouts for various groups in the Capitol Hill Organized Protest (CHOP), including $100 million of unused city facilities,, and more that the Mayor announced after the dismantling of CHOP (CHAZ), according to The Post Millenial.

She promised a $100 million investment in Seattle’s Black, Indigenous, and POC communities and the swift transfer of three buildings to community ownership.

The CHOP zone is also known as CHAZ.

In response to the controversy over the Seattle government’s contract with Taylor, spokesperson Kelsey Nyland clarified that the Not This Time group is one of many community organizations working in the city with the municipality.

On September 21, the Department of Justice identified Seattle as a “jurisdiction” where violence and private property destruction are permitted.

The Department’s statement pointed to Seattle’s city for abandoning the police precinct, and a six-block radius where CHAZ (CHOP) was formed.

With this measure, Attorney General Barr is trying to persuade the Democratic leaders of these cities to maintain law and order and protect their citizens instead of leaving them in the protesters’ hands.

However, with the news of the new “police reform advisor”—an individual who is not only criminal but completely anti-police—the Seattle government appears to be taking steps in the opposite direction.