Thunderstorms are expected to bring unwanted rain to areas along the Arkansas River, which is predicted to crest Wednesday well above record levels in western Arkansas.

Forecasters nudged down by 1.5 feet the predicted crest near Fort Smith, the state’s second-largest city. But they say the river levels will still exceed the previous record there by several feet.

One death in Arkansas has been attributed to the flooding, which also persists in parts of Oklahoma. Two levees have been topped in rural areas of Arkansas.

This May 28, 2019 aerial photo shows flooded homes along Arkansas River in Sand Spring, Okla. Communities that have seen little rain are getting hit by historic flooding along the Arkansas River thanks to downpours upstream that have prompted officials to open dams to protect some cities but inundate others with swells of water. (DroneBase via AP)
This May 28, 2019 aerial photo shows flooded homes along Arkansas River in Sand Spring, Okla. Communities that have seen little rain are getting hit by historic flooding along the Arkansas River thanks to downpours upstream that have prompted officials to open dams to protect some cities but inundate others with swells of water. (DroneBase via AP)

In Tulsa, Mayor G.T. Bynum said Tuesday that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will continue releasing 275,000 cubic feet (7,787 cubic meters) per second to help drain the swollen Keystone Lake reservoir. Bynum says that number could increase depending on the rainfall.

This Tuesday, May 28, 2019 aerial photo shows a flooded highway Arkansas River in Sand Spring, Okla. Communities that have seen little rain are getting hit by historic flooding along the Arkansas River thanks to downpours upstream that have prompted officials to open dams to protect some cities but inundate others with swells of water. (DroneBase via AP)
This Tuesday, May 28, 2019 aerial photo shows a flooded highway Arkansas River in Sand Spring, Okla. Communities that have seen little rain are getting hit by historic flooding along the Arkansas River thanks to downpours upstream that have prompted officials to open dams to protect some cities but inundate others with swells of water. (DroneBase via AP)