An actress of the popular “Desperate Housewives” series has been sentenced to 14 days in jail by a federal judge for her involvement in a scheme of fraudulent college admissions.

Felicity Huffman, 56, will spend 14 days in prison, pay a $30,000 fine, and perform 250 hours of community service, Fox News reported.

The winner of an Emmy for her role in the popular series “Desperate Housewives” must self-report to a facility chosen by the federal Bureau of Prisons on Oct. 25.

“I think this is the right sentence here,” U.S. District Court Judge Indira Talwani told Huffman.

Felicity Huffman, left, writer/director William H. Macy and Eva Longoria arrive at the Los Angeles VIP screening of "Rudderless" at the Vista Theater in 2014. (Dan Steinberg / Invision / AP, File)
Felicity Huffman, left, writer/director William H. Macy and Eva Longoria arrive at the Los Angeles VIP screening of “Rudderless” at the Vista Theater in 2014. (Dan Steinberg / Invision / AP, File)

“You can move forward and rebuild your life after this. Without this sentence, I think the community around you would ask why you got away with this,” she added, according to Fox News.

“I’m sorry to you, judge. I am deeply sorry to the students, parents and colleges impacted by my actions,” the actress said before receiving the sentence.

“I am sorry to my daughters and my husband. I have betrayed them all,” Huffman added.

The actress, a well-known Democratic donor, pleaded guilty in May to bribing college prep expert William “Rick” Singer to doctor the scores of her eldest daughter, Sophia, after she took the SAT final exam, according to Page Six.

Singer was the mastermind of a scheme that provided wealthy parents with places for their children at the best colleges.

Prior to sentencing, prosecutors had asked for at least a month’s imprisonment and 12 months’ supervised release.

“Huffman’s conduct was deliberate and manifestly criminal: it was wrong, she knew it was wrong, and she actively participated in manipulating her daughter’s guidance counselor, the testing services, and the schools to which her daughter applied,” prosecutors alleged during the trial, according to ABC News.

“Her efforts weren’t driven by need or desperation, but by a sense of entitlement, or at least moral cluelessness, facilitated by wealth and insularity,” the prosecutor’s office wrote in a document according to Fox News.

“Millions of parents send their kids to college every year. All of them care as much she does about their children’s fortunes. But they don’t buy fake SAT scores,” the document added.