When President Trump vetoed the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA,) he had the best interests of servicemen and women, as well as making an attempt to reduce the control and power that Big Tech and social media exert over Americans.

The House voted on Monday, Dec. 28, to overwhelmingly override his veto, 109 House Republicans joining Democrats voting to override Trump, and 20 Republicans not voting. The vote went down at 322-87, well in excess of the two-thirds the House needed to override the president’s veto.

Last week the president vetoed the NDAA, which authorizes Pentagon activities and $740 billion in spending for 2021, as he wanted a provision to rescind Section 230, scrapping the immunity that Big Tech and social medicare are privy to from lawsuits. He also wanted the provision to rename military bases after Confederate figures revoked, reported Breitbart.

Sixty-six Republicans voted to uphold the president’s veto, and the bill now will be voted on by the Senate, and again two-thirds of the vote is required to override the president’s veto.

Included in Republicans who voted to uphold the president’s veto is Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) who said during a floor speech, “I oppose the NDAA not because I’m against our troops, but because I love them so much. America’s fighting men and women are so precious that they should not have to die in some failed state, some faraway land that most Americans can’t even point to on a map so defense contractors can extend our involvement in these wars so that lobbyists can get rich, and so that members of Congress can get re-elected.”

 

 

Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Texas) also voted to uphold Trump’s veto on the bill’s lack of repeal of Section 230. “The act fails to terminate Section 230 and is a gift to our enemies like communist China!” he tweeted.

 

 

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) said he voted to defend Trump’s veto.

Today, I voted to defend President @realDonaldTrump‘s veto of the NDAA because it serves foreign interests, not American interests. President Trump has always been a staunch advocate of our troops, and sadly, this bill does not prioritize them or our nation’s future,” he tweeted.

Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) also tweeted that he objected to the override of Trump’s veto. He tweeted, “The NDAA limits the President’s ability to bring troops home from Afghanistan. Congress has Constitutional authority to declare war, but the President has authority to move troops. I previously voted against the NDAA bill and tonight I voted to support @realDonaldTrump’s veto.

 

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise reportedly voted to uphold Trump’s veto.