President Donald Trump is enthusiastic about the possible candidacy of former baseball player Curt Schilling for Congress in his home state of Arizona. The president thinks this is “terrific,” he said in a tweet.

“Curt Schilling, a great pitcher and patriot, is considering a run for Congress in Arizona. Terrific!”

For his part, Schilling, a Massachusetts resident, said he had discussed the possibility with his wife and that although some important aspects still need to be considered, it is something he is absolutely considering, according to the local newspaper The Arizona Republic.

The former baseball player from the Republican Party would face one of the five members of the Democratic Party.

FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2012, file photo, former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling looks on after being introduced as a new member of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame before a baseball game between the Red Sox and the Minnesota Twins at Fenway Park in Boston. Schilling is joining the Breitbart News Network as host of the conservative organization's first online radio show beginning Tuesday at 9 a.m. ET. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson, File)
Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling was introduced as a new member of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame before a baseball game between the Red Sox and the Minnesota Twins at Fenway Park in Boston, on Aug.3, 2012. (Winslow Townson/AP Photo, File)

“The state is not the state I grew up in. Making Arizona citizens of EVERY Race, religion and sexual orientation 2nd class citizens to illegal immigrants is about as anti-American as it gets,” Schilling told the same media.

He also stressed that in the face of existing needs, in terms of care for the elderly and children, deriving tax money to spend on drug traffickers and immigrants was not right.

As part of his baseball career, Schilling became famous in the World Series with the Diamondbacks in 2001 and then with the Boston Red Sox in 2004.

He also has six All-Star selections, three World series titles, and a World Series MVP that enhances his 20-year career in the major leagues, according to the Western Journal.

After retiring from active sports in 2007, he worked as an ESPN analyst until 2016.

He has always been consistent in his political ideas as a conservative and a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump.