Last Tuesday, during Fox News’ Tucker Carlson Tonight program, John Matze, the executive director of the emerging social network Parler, spoke about the platform’s growth and detailed the way it is managed so as not to limit freedom of expression.

As a “massive growth explosion,” Parler’s CEO defined his platform’s recent popularity as a result of the current discontent that afflicts thousands of Twitter and Facebook users in the face of excessive censorship.

“So, as opposed to these other companies where moderation seems to be the norm, on Parler, we have a community jury,” he said.

“This is where the people decide what is allowed and what’s not allowed. You’re judged by your peers, just like our government allows for people.”

Matze added that a user is innocent until proven guilty on the social network, which differentiates it from other platforms that work for “convenience” to find reasons to “find you guilty.”

Twitter, for example, has actively implemented censorship against President Donald Trump’s official account, especially during the elections, where it has discredited his claims of electoral fraud.

Several of the president’s tweets declaring an election victory are labeled “Official sources called this election differently” and refer users to a page that says, “Joe Biden is the projected winner of the 2020 presidential election.”

Twitter and Facebook also recently blocked a story published by the New York Post related to the illicit businesses of former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, during the Barack Obama administration.

At a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday morning, the CEOs of Facebook and Twitter testified. The latter acknowledged that their crackdown on the New York Post article was rushed.

“We made a quick interpretation using no other evidence that the materials in the article were obtained through hacking, and according to our policy, we blocked them from being spread,” Jack Dorsey said, according to Fox News.

Meanwhile, Parler takes a much more laissez-faire approach, offering a platform where users, “liberated from restrictions,” can publicly express their ideas.

“Do you believe that we should have somebody in, you know, New York, let’s say in the middle of Times Square, telling you what you can and cannot say? Because that’s what these companies are doing. I don’t know why they’re so afraid,” Matze said.

“Maybe it’s because they don’t like that people are getting power again,” added the CEO of the emerging social network that currently has more than 8 million members in total and more than 4.5 million active members per month.

According to Apptopia spokesman Adam Blacker to FOX Business on Nov. 9, “Parler started rising in downloads on Friday [Nov. 6]”.

“They more than doubled week over week. Parler has been newly installed 312,199 times over the past [seven] days. The [seven] days before that, it was downloaded 150,117 times,” he added, as reported by Fox News.