Waterlogged parts of the central U.S. were bracing Wednesday for more rain, following days of severe storms that have battered Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma and caused at least three deaths.

Officials were urging residents of Webbers Falls, Oklahoma, some 70 miles (113 kilometers) southeast of Tulsa, to leave their homes as the Arkansas River approached near-historic levels in the town of about 600 people. The National Weather Service has issued flood warnings in the northeastern corner of Oklahoma through the weekend. More than 8 inches (20 centimeters) of rain has fallen since Sunday in parts of Oklahoma after an already rainy spring.

“The biggest concern is more rain. I mean, there’s more rain in the forecast for Tulsa, for northern Oklahoma,” Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt said during a news conference following an aerial tour with Tulsa Mayor G.W. Bynum and other officials Wednesday morning.

Flooding in Kingfisher, Okla. is pictured Tuesday, May 21, 2019. Flooding following heavy rains was an issue across the state. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Flooding in Kingfisher, Okla. is pictured Tuesday, May 21, 2019. Flooding following heavy rains was an issue across the state. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

The deluge inundated roadways, closing highways in 17 Kansas counties, along with more than 330 Missouri roads. Amtrak also suspended train service Wednesday and Thursday along a route between St. Louis and Kansas City because of congestion and flood-related delays.

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday night into Thursday, the latest in a multi-day stretch of storms that have produced dozens of tornadoes.

Bynum said Tulsa is so far safe from the rising Arkansas River, which the National Weather Service said was at 34.5 feet (10.5 meters), or 6.5 feet (2 meters) above flood stage, as of Wednesday morning. The river was expected to rise to 40 feet (12 meters) by Thursday morning.

This Tuesday, May 21, 2019 photo released by Missouri State Highway Patrol shows the storm damage from a suspected tornado in Wright County at the Town and Country Supermarket in Hartville, Mo. Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday. (Missouri State Highway Patrol via AP)
This Tuesday, May 21, 2019 photo released by Missouri State Highway Patrol shows the storm damage from a suspected tornado in Wright County at the Town and Country Supermarket in Hartville, Mo. Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see more severe weather Wednesday. (Missouri State Highway Patrol via AP)

“The levee system is working the way it’s supposed to right now. The river park is serving as a buffer along the river corridor,” Bynum said.

Deaths from the storms include a 74-year-old woman found early Wednesday morning in Iowa. Officials there say she was killed by a possible tornado that damaged a farmstead in Adair County. Missouri authorities said heavy rain was a contributing factor in the deaths of two people in a traffic accident Tuesday near Springfield.

A fourth weather-related death may have occurred in Oklahoma, where the Highway Patrol said an unidentified woman apparently drowned after driving around a barricade Tuesday into high water near Perkins, about 45 miles (72 kilometers) northeast of Oklahoma City, and was swept off the highway. The unidentified woman’s body was sent to the state medical examiner’s office to confirm the cause of death. Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Keli Cain said she isn’t yet listed as what would be the state’s first storm-related death.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt surveys flooding damage near Minco, Okla., from the air Tuesday, May 21, 2019, following heavy rains across the state. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt surveys flooding damage near Minco, Okla., from the air Tuesday, May 21, 2019, following heavy rains across the state. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
David Dick wades out of the water after checking on his flooded home in Sperry, Okla., Tuesday, May 21, 2019. A tornado touched down near Tulsa International Airport amid storms in the Southern Plains that brought a deluge of rain and powerful winds, closing an interstate and flipping campers at a raceway. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)
David Dick wades out of the water after checking on his flooded home in Sperry, Okla., Tuesday, May 21, 2019. A tornado touched down near Tulsa International Airport amid storms in the Southern Plains that brought a deluge of rain and powerful winds, closing an interstate and flipping campers at a raceway. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)
Tony Brinker, a volunteer with the Augusta Fire Protection District, cuts trees that were blocking Highway 94, Tuesday, May 21, 2019, near Augusta, Mo. A long north-south line of storms hit the St. Louis area Tuesday evening. The storms are part of a weather system moving across the Midwest that began last weekend and will continue through the week, according to the National Weather Service. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Tony Brinker, a volunteer with the Augusta Fire Protection District, cuts trees that were blocking Highway 94, Tuesday, May 21, 2019, near Augusta, Mo. A long north-south line of storms hit the St. Louis area Tuesday evening. The storms are part of a weather system moving across the Midwest that began last weekend and will continue through the week, according to the National Weather Service. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Crews begin to replace electric lines across from a tornado damaged home, Tuesday, May 21, 2019, near Mangum, Okla. Dangerous storms left a string of more than 30 tornadoes across the central U.S., damaging homes in Oklahoma, demolishing a racetrack grandstand in Missouri and inundating the region with water over a short period. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Crews begin to replace electric lines across from a tornado damaged home, Tuesday, May 21, 2019, near Mangum, Okla. Dangerous storms left a string of more than 30 tornadoes across the central U.S., damaging homes in Oklahoma, demolishing a racetrack grandstand in Missouri and inundating the region with water over a short period. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A storm front seen from Chesterfield Parkway westbound onramp to Highway 40 (Interstate 64) is seen looking west in to St. Charles County, in Missouri. The storm rolled into the region Tuesday evening. Funnel clouds were reported in St. Charles County, but there were no immediate reports of major damage. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
A storm front seen from Chesterfield Parkway westbound onramp to Highway 40 (Interstate 64) is seen looking west in to St. Charles County, in Missouri. The storm rolled into the region Tuesday evening. Funnel clouds were reported in St. Charles County, but there were no immediate reports of major damage. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)