According to Harvard Legal professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz, who told Newsmax on Saturday, June 26, that the suspension of Rudy Giuliani’s law license would likely not stand up since it was done without due process, there will be “no lawyers left” if attorneys are disbarred with everything they say.

“Plea bargain associations always involve puffing of your side, always involve exaggerations,” said the Dershowitz.

Giuliani’s license to practice law in New York has been revoked after a state appeals court ruled this week that he lied in claiming that his client, former President Donald Trump, was robbed of the 2020 presidential election.

The court stated Giuliani made false statements about voting in Georgia, Arizona, and Pennsylvania, citing a court appearance in Pennsylvania when the former New York City mayor claimed rampant voter fraud but did not include it in his previous written complaint.

“I taught legal ethics for 35 years at Harvard,” Dershowitz continued. “I’ve never seen a case like this.”

Meanwhile, according to Dershowitz, Giuliani did not have a hearing or an opportunity to prove whether or not he stated the truth or whether he knew he was lying.

According to Dershowitz, the judgment against Giuliani’s legal license might hold in New York courts, which means it could wind up before the Supreme Court.

Nonetheless, Dershowitz believes it will be far more difficult to uphold Giuliani’s suspension following the hearing.

“The criteria is so vague,” added Dershowitz, stressing that the court decided against Giuliani not just for his “misstatements” in court but also for his media comments.

“If you start holding lawyers responsible for everything,” Dershowitz added, “my God, I can tell you myself and my own experience: Many, many lawyers who have committed much, much worse lies in the public domain, and they don’t go after them,” and “This is a very selective department.”

Dershowitz also predicted that the Department of Justice’s lawsuit against Georgia over the state’s new voting reform statute would fail in the fight against voter identification requirements.

“In the end, some of the law will be upheld, and maybe some of it will be struck down, but this Georgia law is not about race,” Dershowitz added.

The Supreme Court, according to Dershowitz, will not look “sympathetically” at the DOJ’s challenge in the end since its goal is to persuade fewer Republicans to vote.

“They’ll see it as political and not racial,” he said. Dershowitz also stated that needing identification to vote is not a problem in his view.

“You have to get ID to get into a building today, to get into an airplane,” he explained. “Why what’s wrong with the requiring id to vote? I don’t see any problem with that.”