The New York Times, The Washington Post, NBC News, and others generate outrage for publishing falsehoods, in the case of former President Donald Trump’s distinguished lawyer Rudy Giuliani, allegedly based on anonymous sources.

Although some of them recanted, they equally appear to give reason to the 75 percent of respondents who argued in 2018 that “mainstream traditional news sources” purposely contribute “false, false or misleading” information, Fox News cited May 3. 

The rejected fake news story claimed that the FBI had tipped off Giuliani that he was being followed because of a Russian disinformation campaign, which was not the case, and rather appeared to be an attempt to soften the outrage against the FBI when it entered Giuliani’s home to seize his electronic devices on April 28. 

According to Harvard law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz, the FBI’s actions violated the Constitution; a subpoena alone would have sufficed, even more so given that Giuliani himself had previously offered to turn over his devices.  

“That didn’t happen in America, and that’s happening in America now. They’re going after Rudy Giuliani … Who knows who’s going to be next?” expressed the professor who also defended Trump in the Democrats’ first fake impeachment attempt.

Giuliani informed his readers of the correction made by some of the media and demanded that they all reveal who their purported “anonymous sources” were.  

“On a Saturday, the Washington Post added this correction to their defamatory story about me. The Washington Post and the NYT must reveal their sources who lied and targeted an American Citizen.  #msnbc , #cnn  forgot to mention the corrections today.    #fakenews #badpeople”, tweeted Giuliani. 

Media outlets that publish fake news are within their rights to reveal the lying sources, which caused them to make the grievous error to their readers, something none of those implicated in the lies against Giuliani has done.

Logan Hall sums it up nicely on Twitter:

this is how the corporate press pushes misinformation with impunity. making huge waves on stories that totally fall flat and then, once the damage is done, quietly walking back or issuing corrections. and they expect that to redeem them. pic.twitter.com/kalVzttvsW

— Logan Hall (@loganclarkhall) May 2, 2021

In particular author, Mollie Ziegler Hemingway mentioned the media reporters who had to rectify their false information, and questioned whether they should not “burn” their informants. 

“On heels of years of peddling fake and dangerous Russia collusion hoax with anon sources,@nakashimae, @shaneharris and @thamburger just ran with another intel operation against Guiliani, using anon sources.”

She added: “They had to retract an explosive claim today—shouldn’t they burn their sources?”.

Likewise, Twitter user @JarkaPerry commented that the lack of journalistic ethics should end. 

“Enough of this hack journalism. It’s so sad people resort to this type of irresponsible behavior. They should be held accountable. It’s no their life that has been compromised. Why does everything need to be do political. Just report facts on both sides.”

On the other hand, declassified documents from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA) revealed that the FBI has taken data from Americans, illegally obtained by the National Security Agency (NSA).

This information could be used to build cases against supporters of former President Trump, and against other alleged conservatives, i.e. ideological opponents of the Democrats, according to Big League Politics on April 27. 

But it was the Jan. 6 demonstration on Capitol Hill that presented the excuse to unleash political persecution against Trump supporters, in the name of domestic terrorism, and to apply to them a controversial law that Democrats had been preparing since the previous year. 

Apparently, the persecution against Giuliani is one more phase of this apparent political persecution driven by the Democrats. 

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