The coronavirus outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan has now killed 9 people and infected 440 others across the country, Li Bin, deputy director of China’s National Health Commission, said at a Wednesday morning briefing, on Jan. 22 in Beijing.

“Basically, do not go to Wuhan. And those in Wuhan please do not leave the city,” said Li Bin. Signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties. All of the deaths were reported in central Hubei province, where the virus first appeared in the city of Wuhan. 

Authorities also admitted that the country was now at the “most critical stage” of prevention and control.

Four other countries have reported cases of the virus—Thailand, Japan, and South Korea—now including the United States.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials confirmed on Tuesday, Jan. 21, that a patient in Washington state has been infected with the dangerous Wuhan coronavirus.

It is the first case of the “novel coronavirus” detected in the United States. 

The victim, a Snohomish County man, recently traveled to China but did not visit the seafood market where the outbreak originated, nor did he have contact with anyone known to have the virus, CDC officials said.

He flew back to the United States, arriving at Sea-Tac Airport on Jan. 15. He contacted health officials on Jan. 16, and his case was diagnosed over the weekend, said state epidemiologist Dr. Scott Lindquist.

The victim is now in isolation at Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, where he is reported to be in “good” condition, KOMONEWS reported

China recently confirmed the virus has spread between humans. The country’s National Health Commission team said 14 health care workers had caught the respiratory virus while treating patients. Two patients in southern China also caught the virus from infected family members, according to local media. They had not visited Wuhan city, according to Daily Mail

China has still not been able to confirm the exact source of the virus.