On Monday, the Canadian House of Commons passed a unanimous resolution condemning the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) for their human-rights abuses against Uighur Muslims, declaring it a genocide.

More than one million Uighurs are being detained in China’s western Xinjiang region, but Prime Minister Trudeau abstained from voting over the human rights issue.

With a vote of 266 to zero, the opportunity to take further action on policy exists, however Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and most of his cabinet refused to vote, with foreign affairs minister Marc Garneau abstaining on behalf of the government, as reported by Free Beacon.

“When it comes to the application of the very specific word genocide, we simply need to ensure that all the i’s are dotted, and t’s are crossed before a determination like that is made,” Mr. Trudeau said last week.

But the human rights atrocities being committed in China are glaringly obvious, and the world is waking up.

In September 2019, at the United Nations Human Rights Council meeting, a lawyer for the China Tribunal, Hamid Sabi, said the group had proof that the CCP was removing hearts, kidneys, lungs, and skin from Uighur Muslims and members of the Falun Gong spiritual group.

Sabi said the group had found that China was committing “crimes against humanity” by harvesting organs from religious minorities like the Uighurs and Falun Gong members, which has been banned and widely persecuted by the CCP.

The Tribunal’s final report detailed how these prisoners were “cut open while still alive for their kidneys, livers, hearts, lungs, cornea, and skin to be removed and turned into commodities for sale.”

“Victim for victim and death for death, cutting out the hearts and other organs from living, blameless, harmless, peaceable people constitutes one of the worst mass atrocities of this century,” said Sabi.

“Organ transplantation to save life is a scientific and social triumph, but killing the donor is criminal.”

It is rare to hear many first-hand accounts from inside China’s internment camps. Still, recently several reports have surfaced of organized systems of mass rape, torture, and sexual abuse of Uighurs. According to a BBC report, information came not only from the detainees but also from a guard.

Tursunay Ziyawudun spent nine months inside the secretive web of internment camps in the Xinjiang region. She was eventually released and fled to the U.S. There; she told how women were taken from the cells each night and subjected to rape by one or more Chinese men. Ziawudun was tortured and gang-raped on three occasions by two or three men.

“Perhaps this is the most unforgettable scar on me forever,” she said.
“I don’t even want these words to spill from my mouth.”

The men wore suits, says Ziawudun, not police uniforms, and were masked, even though it was before the pandemic had started.

After her first release, she was sent back to the camps as a punishment for her husband’s decision to not return to China, and instead, he remained in Xinjiang.

“On four different occasions, I was taken to an interrogation room, where I was beaten, my private part was electrocuted unbearably by an electric baton, and I was gang-raped,” Ziyawudun told VOA. She added that some of her fellow detainee women never returned to the cell after visiting the interrogation room. The ones who returned were asked to keep quiet or face the consequences.

Bitter Winter reports one ethnic Kazakh who fled the country spoke of men being raped in Xinjiang camps by male guards, saying it is a common occurrence. The younger boys are the primary target.

Reports of the abuse towards men have been told to Human Rights activists in Kazakhstan and elsewhere, but so far, names have been withheld as they have not authorized their names and addresses to be published.

Within Kazakh society, males are ashamed to admit to rape, as the fear of being ostracized is real, and for many, the fear of retribution is also real.

The CCP will, of course, deny that such behavior takes place. When the truth is, they encourage and reward guards and others for such actions.