Democratic nominee Joe Biden, 77, on Monday, Nov. 9,  appointed Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania as a member of his CCP Virus (coronavirus) task force, should he win the 2020 election.

In a 2014 essay in The Atlantic, Emanuel suggested it’s not worth living after you reach 75 and that society, as well as your family members, would be “better off” if nature took “its course swiftly and promptly.”

“Here is a simple truth that many of us seem to resist: living too long is also a loss. It renders many of us, if not disabled, then faltering and declining, a state that may not be worse than death but is nonetheless deprived,” wrote Emanuel.

“It robs us of our creativity and ability to contribute to work, society, the world. It transforms how people experience us, relate to us, and, most important, remember us. We are no longer remembered as vibrant and engaged, but as feeble, ineffectual, even pathetic,” he continued. 

Emanuel pointed to a study suggesting that people loose creativity with age, saying, “The fact is that by 75, creativity, originality, and productivity are pretty much gone for the vast, vast majority of us.”

The doctor also said that he would not take any medical test or treatment if he suffers cancer or other disability after 75.

Emanuel is the brother of former Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel, former President Barack Obama’s then-chief of staff. Emanuel is regarded as one of the key architects of “Obamacare.”

Meanwhile, older adults in the world and particularly in the United States, have been the age group hardest hit by the CCP Virus pandemic. In the United States, people 65 and older account for 16 percent of the U.S. population but 80 percent of CCP Virus deaths.

Emanuel’s appointment to Biden’s coronavirus task force drew criticism from Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Monday. 

“A member of Biden’s new coronavirus task force is a lockdown enthusiast who has written that living past 75 isn’t worth it,” Cotton wrote in a tweet. “Americans want our country opened up, not creepy bioethicists who enjoy playing God.”