Nearly 30% of American people worry that their vote will not be correctly counted, according to a new survey, which comes at a time President Donald Trump’s legal team is making efforts to identify voter fraud in the presidential election.

A Rasmussen poll released on Wednesday, Nov. 11, indicates that 28% of voters are not confident that the votes in their state for last week’s election will be correctly recorded and counted, with 15% who are “Not At All Confident.”

A majority of voters (71%) are confident the vote in their state will be correct, but that includes only 47% who are “Very Confident.”

Just two weeks before Election Day, 94% of respondents said their vote would be correctly recorded and counted, with 73% who said it was “Very Likely.”

Fifty-nine percent are now concerned that the increased use of voting by mail will lead to more voter fraud, including 44% who are “Very Concerned.”

Rasmussen said it conducted the survey with 1,000 “Likely U.S. Voters” from Nov. 5 and Nov. 8. During that period, some legacy media have called Democrat Joe Biden the winner though the final count is not available, and President Trump’s campaign is filing legal challenges to the vote in several states.

The survey shows that 64% of Democratic voters are “Very Confident” the votes in their state will be correctly recorded and counted, but just 34% of Republican voters and 40% of unaffiliated voters agree.

Meanwhile, 70% of Republican voters are very concerned that the increased use of mail-in voting will lead to more voter fraud, but 24% of Democratic voters and 39% of unaffiliated share that view.