Advocates and members of Congress are questioning the treatment of children who cross the U.S.-Mexico border with relatives other than their parents.

The Texas Civil Rights Project released a report Thursday that counts 272 separations at a single Texas courthouse since June, when President Donald Trump issued an executive order that ended widespread family separations amid public outrage.

The group says 38 separations involved a parent or legal guardian, the majority of whom had criminal records. Most of the rest involved another adult relative.

U.S. immigration authorities say that under anti-trafficking law, a child crossing the border without a parent or legal guardian must be considered “unaccompanied,” even if the adult with them is a relative.

Unaccompanied children and teenagers from Central America are generally sent to government facilities, while the adults could face detention and prosecution for illegally entering the U.S.

FILE - In this June 17, 2018 file photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, people who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP, File)
FILE – In this June 17, 2018 file photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, people who’ve been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, rest in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP, File)

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