The vast majority of Republican voters have a more optimistic view of the overall state of the country compared to four years ago, according to data collected from a CBS News poll of participants in the new Republican National Convention (RNC).

According to the survey of registered voters across the country, 75 percent of voters identifying as Republicans say the country is better off now than it was four years ago.

When asked what gave them the indication that the United States was in a better place than in 2016, 82 percent of Republican voters cited their faith in the president’s leadership, while 7 percent cited the national economy, and 6 percent cited their family finances.

Seven out of ten Republican voters who said the country is better off than in 2016, also said the Democrats’ lack of power was a key reason for the country’s success, suggesting deep partisan animosity and a total distrust of the Democratic Party.

According to the results, for most Republicans, the United States is a nation where the economy is still “pretty good,” despite the crisis it had to face due to the CCP virus.

For the vast majority, the effort to manage the virus is going at least “somewhat well,” and the president would be doing a “very good job” in this regard. In general terms, it was noticeable that the virus does not imply a significant concern for the respondents.

In turn, many of those involved tend to believe that the 170,000 deaths are an exaggerated count.

Regarding the racial issue, an overwhelming number of Republicans (8 out of 10), said discrimination was getting too much attention lately. A majority of Republican voters disagree with the ideas of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. Two-thirds “totally disagree” with the ideas.

YouGov conducted CBS News’ national poll using a nationally representative sample of 2,226 registered U.S. voters, interviewed between Aug. 19–21, 2020. The margin of error is ± 2.4 points.

Today, in a face-to-face roll call vote, Republicans officially named President Trump to represent their party on the ballot in the November 3 presidential election.

The electorate will determine the final result of the election in November. Political scientist Helmut Norpoth guarantees a landslide victory for incumbent President Trump based on what he called the Primary Model, a statistical representation of U.S. presidential elections based on data dating back over a century.

In 2016, Norpoth, using his successful Primary Model system, was one of the few to predict a victory for Donald J Trump.