Georgia Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler requested the resignation of Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for not counting only legal votes as initially instructed, in the presidential election.

“The management of Georgia’s elections has become an embarrassment to our state. Georgians are outraged, and with good reason,” the two senators stated from the official website on Nov. 9. 

And they decided, “The Secretary of State has failed to deliver honest and transparent elections. He has failed the people of Georgia, and he should step down immediately.”

They added, “We have been clear from the beginning: Every legal vote cast should be counted. Any illegal vote must not. And there must be transparency and uniformity in the counting process.” 

They also clarified that they are not trying to establish partisan guidelines but to be true to the American spirit.

“This isn’t hard. This isn’t partisan. This is American. We believe when there are failures, they need to be called out — even when it’s in your own party,” wrote Perdue and Loeffler.

They also declared Raffensperger’s administration unacceptable.

“The mismanagement and lack of transparency from the Secretary of State is unacceptable. Honest elections are paramount to the foundation of our democracy,” they reiterated.

The decision comes after election results were certified in 47 of 159 counties and President Donald Trump was outvoted by 10,621 votes by Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden. 

Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), took over the direction of the vote count from Nov. 8. 

“In order for Americans to have full faith and confidence in our elections, every legal vote must be counted and every illegal or fraudulent vote must be excluded” Collins said, referring to his new role, according to Breitbart.

The controversial procedures followed, in what has come to be considered the most important presidential election in U.S. history, prompted U.S. Attorney General William Barr to launch an official investigation

“Such inquiries and reviews may be conducted if there are clear and apparently-credible allegations of irregularities that, if true, could potentially impact the outcome of a federal election in an individual State,” said Barr, in a memo sent to all the attorneys general on Nov. 9.

“[DOJ] has an obligation to ensure that federal elections are conducted in such a way that the American people can have full confidence in their electoral process and their government,” Barr concluded in his memorandum.