Hurricane rating system fails to account for deadly rain

Science 09/18/18, 09:11

When meteorologists downgraded Hurricane Florence from a powerful Category 4 storm to a Category 2 and then a Category 1, Wayne Mills figured he could stick it out.He regrets it. The Neuse River, normally 150 feet away, lapped near his door in New Bern, North Carolina, on Sunday even as ...

Wilmington Isle: Food, water handouts set in isolated city

U.S. 09/18/18, 00:57

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — With one of North Carolina's largest cities still mostly cut off by floodwaters from Hurricane Florence, officials prepared to begin distributing food, water and tarps to Wilmington residents as yet more people were rescued from submerged inland neighborhoods.

WHAT’S HAPPENING: Water will haunt Carolinas after Florence

U.S. 09/18/18, 00:52

MIAMI (AP) — Like hurricanes Harvey and Katrina before it, Florence will be remembered for unleashing a staggering amount of water over a vast area. The flooding unfolded just as forecasters expected, but many residents in the Carolinas still seemed caught off guard as they were plucked off a vehicle's ...

S. Carolina gov spots men on flooded road, summons rescue

U.S. 09/17/18, 23:53

CHERAW, S.C. (AP) — As South Carolina continues its wait to see how the rains of Florence will impact the state's low-lying communities, Gov. Henry McMaster's flight over soggy parts of the state Monday turned from an observation trip to a rescue mission when he spotted two people stranded atop ...

Florence likely to expose gaps in flood insurance

Business 09/17/18, 07:32

NEW YORK (AP) — The number of Americans with flood insurance is on the rise, yet Hurricane Florence is likely to make it painfully clear that too many homeowners in the Carolinas and other vulnerable regions remain unprotected.

WHAT’S HAPPENING: Rain, floods still in Florence’s forecast

U.S. 09/17/18, 01:13

MIAMI (AP) — The forecast for Florence has not changed, unfortunately: It's still raining, and rivers are still rising. All but one road in and out of a North Carolina city of 120,000 people are underwater or blocked by debris. Residents of inland communities who thought they were safe from ...

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