An LGBT sports journalist called MMA’s transgender fighter Fallon Fox the “bravest athlete in history.” The comment was strongly criticized from various sectors because Fox, due to his physical superiority, broke the skull of two opponents during their fights.

In an article published on Jan. 14 on the sports news portal focused on LGBT personalities, Outsports, journalist Cyd Zeigler named Fox as the “bravest athlete in history” since, according to the author, he “was the target of a torrent of hatred.”

Zeigler’s rating drew criticism because Fox, who is a biological man who fights female opponents, brutally beat Erika Newsome in a fight in Coral Gables, Florida, during an MMA fight in 2013.

During the match, Fox grabbed the back of Newsome’s skull, lifted her leg as she pulled her opponent’s head down and kneed her over the chin, according to The Post Millennial. Newsome fell unconscious on the mat and that was her last professional fight.

“But for the Outsports, a male-bodied person beating a female bodied person unconscious constitutes bravery,” said journalist Libby Emmons of The Post Millennial.

A year later, Fox also beat Tamikka Brents, giving her a concussion and breaking seven orbital bones.

“But that’s super brave, too, taking an unfair, male-bodied advantage and using it to give female-bodied opponents brain injuries,” Emmons said.

Brents hadn’t been told that Fox was a transsexual before she was in the ring with him.

“I’ve fought a lot of women and have never felt the strength that I felt in a fight as I did that night,” Brents said in recounting her experience in the MMA against Fox.

“I’ve never felt so overpowered ever in my life, and I am an abnormally strong female,” she said, according to the conservative site The Federalist.

“As intense as the ‘hatred’ Fox may have been subjected to, it’s highly unlikely that the social media comments directed his way ever fractured his skull,” Breitbart columnist Penny Star said.

“The title of bravest athlete would have been much more appropriately bestowed on the biological females who dared to enter the cage with a fighter they had no hope of matching in terms of power and athletic ability,” Star concluded.