A University of Denver team is using drone images to create a 3D reconstruction of a World War II-era Japanese internment camp in southern Colorado.

Researchers last week used the drone from the Switzerland-based company senseFly as part of a mapping project to help future restoration work at Camp Amache in Granada, Colorado.

From 1942 to 1945, more than 7,000 Japanese-Americans and Japanese immigrants were forcibly relocated to Camp Amache. They were among the 110,000 Japanese-Americans ordered to camps throughout the U.S.

FILE - This Jan. 18, 2015, file photo shows a rebuilt watchtower at Camp Amache, the site of a former World War II-era Japanese-American internment camp in Granada, Colo. A University of Denver team is using a drone to create a 3D reconstruction of the camp in southern Colorado. The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve historical sites connected to people of color in the U.S. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)
FILE – This Jan. 18, 2015, file photo shows a rebuilt watchtower at Camp Amache, the site of a former World War II-era Japanese-American internment camp in Granada, Colo. A University of Denver team is using a drone to create a 3D reconstruction of the camp in southern Colorado. The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve historical sites connected to people of color in the U.S. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)

The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve U.S. historical sites connected to people of color.

For example, a digital project headed up by Brown University professor Monica Martinez seeks to locate sites connected to racial violence along the Texas border with Mexico.

FILE - This Jan. 18, 2015, file photo, shows a sign denoting the site of the police station of Camp Amache, a former World War II-era Japanese-American internment camp in Granada, Colo. A University of Denver team is using a drone to create a 3D reconstruction of the camp in southern Colorado. The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve historical sites connected to people of color in the U.S. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)
FILE – This Jan. 18, 2015, file photo, shows a sign denoting the site of the police station of Camp Amache, a former World War II-era Japanese-American internment camp in Granada, Colo. A University of Denver team is using a drone to create a 3D reconstruction of the camp in southern Colorado. The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve historical sites connected to people of color in the U.S. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2007, file photo, Bob Fuchigami looks through one of the albums of photographs that he has collected on Camp Amache during an interview at his home near Evergreen, Colo. Fuchigami was 12-year-old when he and his family were forced to leave their 20-acre farm in Northern California for the Japanese-American internment camp in Granada, Colo. A University of Denver team is using a drone to create a 3D reconstruction of the camp in southern Colorado. The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve historical sites connected to people of color in the U.S.   (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)
FILE – In this Nov. 16, 2007, file photo, Bob Fuchigami looks through one of the albums of photographs that he has collected on Camp Amache during an interview at his home near Evergreen, Colo. Fuchigami was 12-year-old when he and his family were forced to leave their 20-acre farm in Northern California for the Japanese-American internment camp in Granada, Colo. A University of Denver team is using a drone to create a 3D reconstruction of the camp in southern Colorado. The Amache effort is part of a growing movement to identify and preserve historical sites connected to people of color in the U.S.  (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

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