NASA’s first flight to the moon is marking its 50th anniversary.

FILE - This Dec. 24, 1968, file photo made available by NASA shows the Earth behind the surface of the moon during the Apollo 8 mission. (William Anders/NASA via AP, File)
FILE – This Dec. 24, 1968, file photo made available by NASA shows the Earth behind the surface of the moon during the Apollo 8 mission. (William Anders/NASA via AP, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 18, 1968, file photo, Apollo 8 astronauts, from left, James Lovell, command module pilot; William Anders, lunar module pilot; and Frank Borman, commander, stand in front of mission simulator prior to training in exercise for their scheduled six-day lunar orbital mission at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – In this Dec. 18, 1968, file photo, Apollo 8 astronauts, from left, James Lovell, command module pilot; William Anders, lunar module pilot; and Frank Borman, commander, stand in front of mission simulator prior to training in exercise for their scheduled six-day lunar orbital mission at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - This April 5, 2018 photo provided by the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago shows Apollo 8 astronauts, from left, William Anders, James Lovell, Frank Borman at the museum. (J.B. Spector/Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago via AP, File)
FILE – This April 5, 2018 photo provided by the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago shows Apollo 8 astronauts, from left, William Anders, James Lovell, Frank Borman at the museum. (J.B. Spector/Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago via AP, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 21, 1968, file photo made available by NASA, Apollo 8 Commander Col. Frank Borman leads the way as he, and fellow astronauts Command Module Pilot Capt. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE – In this Dec. 21, 1968, file photo made available by NASA, Apollo 8 Commander Col. Frank Borman leads the way as he, and fellow astronauts Command Module Pilot Capt. (NASA via AP, File)

On Dec. 21st, 1968, three men flew to the moon for the first time in human history.

In this 1968 photo made available by NASA, a section of the Saturn V rocket is prepared for the Dec. 21, 1968 launch of the Apollo 8 mission at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (NASA via AP, File)
In this 1968 photo made available by NASA, a section of the Saturn V rocket is prepared for the Dec. 21, 1968 launch of the Apollo 8 mission at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE - In this December 1968 file photo, the Saturn V rocket carrying the Apollo 8 crew is prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – In this December 1968 file photo, the Saturn V rocket carrying the Apollo 8 crew is prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (AP Photo/File)
In this Dec. 21, 1968 photo made available by NASA, the Saturn V rocket carrying the Apollo 8 crew launches from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida with 7. (NASA via AP, File)
In this Dec. 21, 1968 photo made available by NASA, the Saturn V rocket carrying the Apollo 8 crew launches from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida with 7. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 22, 1968 image from video made available by NASA, astronaut Frank Borman waves goodbye at the end of a television transmission from the Apollo 8 spacecraft enroute to moon. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE – In this Dec. 22, 1968 image from video made available by NASA, astronaut Frank Borman waves goodbye at the end of a television transmission from the Apollo 8 spacecraft enroute to moon. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE - In this December 1968, file photo made available by NASA, Lt. Col. William A. Anders, Apollo 8 lunar module pilot, looks out of a window during the spaceflight. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE – In this December 1968, file photo made available by NASA, Lt. Col. William A. Anders, Apollo 8 lunar module pilot, looks out of a window during the spaceflight. (NASA via AP, File)

Apollo 8 commander Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders orbited the moon on Christmas Eve, reading from the Book of Genesis. To this day, the mission is considered NASA’s boldest and perhaps most dangerous undertaking ever. NASA whipped it together in four months, in order to beat the Soviets to the moon.

FILE - This Dec. 24, 1968, file photo shows a television screen with a view of the moon transmitted by the Apollo 8 astronauts as it orbited. (AP Photo/Anthony Camerano, File)
FILE – This Dec. 24, 1968, file photo shows a television screen with a view of the moon transmitted by the Apollo 8 astronauts as it orbited. (AP Photo/Anthony Camerano, File)
FILE - This Dec. 29, 1968 photo made available by NASA shows the large moon crater Goclenius, foreground, approximately 40 statute miles in diameter, and three clustered craters Magelhaens, Magelhaens A, and Colombo A, during the Apollo 8 mission. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE – This Dec. 29, 1968 photo made available by NASA shows the large moon crater Goclenius, foreground, approximately 40 statute miles in diameter, and three clustered craters Magelhaens, Magelhaens A, and Colombo A, during the Apollo 8 mission. (NASA via AP, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 27, 1968 file photo, divers help recover the Apollo 8 crew from their capsule after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – In this Dec. 27, 1968 file photo, divers help recover the Apollo 8 crew from their capsule after splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Dec. 19, 1968, file photo, spotlights illuminate the 363-foot-tall Saturn V booster rocket on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the Apollo 8 spacecraft and its crew of three astronauts. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – In this Dec. 19, 1968, file photo, spotlights illuminate the 363-foot-tall Saturn V booster rocket on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the Apollo 8 spacecraft and its crew of three astronauts. (AP Photo/File)
Apollo 8 is considered NASA’s boldest undertaking ever. As it marks its 50th anniversary this Christmas, space experts and one of the astronauts tell the story of the Earthrise photo, which remains the most iconic space snapshot. (Dec 18)
Apollo 8 is considered NASA’s boldest undertaking ever. As it marks its 50th anniversary this Christmas, space experts and one of the astronauts tell the story of the Earthrise photo, which remains the most iconic space snapshot. (Dec 18)

A photo taken by Anders of the Earth rising above the lunar landscape remains the most iconic space snapshot.

Source: The Associated Press