Chances look slim for ending the partial government shutdown any time soon.

Lawmakers are away from Washington for the holidays and have been told they will get 24 hours’ notice before having to return for a vote. And although the Senate is slated to come into session Thursday afternoon, few senators were expected to be around for it.

After a weekend and two holiday days for federal employees, Wednesday was the first regularly scheduled workday affected by the closure of a variety of federal services.

Trump vowed to hold the line on his budget demand, telling reporters during his visit to Iraq on Wednesday that he’ll do “whatever it takes” to get money for border security. He declined to say how much he would accept in a deal to end the shutdown.

“You have to have a wall, you have to have protection,” he said.

Back from the 29-hour trip to visit U.S. troops, Trump said in a Thursday tweet “we desperately need” a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, funding for which has been a flashpoint between the White House and Congress ever since Trump took office.

He called on Democrats in Congress to fund his wall, saying the shutdown affects their supporters. He asserted: “Do the Dems realize that most of the people not getting paid are Democrats?”

Virginia Democratic Sen. Mark Warner called Trump’s comments “outrageous.” In his tweet, he added: “Federal employees don’t go to work wearing red or blue jerseys. They’re public servants. And the President is treating them like poker chips at one of his failed casinos.”

The shutdown started Saturday when funding lapsed for nine Cabinet-level departments and dozens of agencies. Roughly 420,000 workers were deemed essential and are working unpaid, while an additional 380,000 have been furloughed.

While the White House was talking to congressional Democrats — and staff talks continued on Capitol Hill — negotiations dragged Wednesday, dimming hopes for a swift breakthrough.

Republican Rep. Mark Meadows of North Carolina said the president “is very firm in his resolve that we need to secure our border.” He told CNN, “If they believe that this president is going to yield on this particular issue, they’re misreading him.”

The impasse over government funding began last week, when the Senate approved a bipartisan deal keeping government open into February. That bill provided $1.3 billion for border security projects but not money for the wall. At Trump’s urging, the House approved that package and inserted the $5.7 billion he had requested.

But Senate Republicans lacked the votes they needed to force the measure through their chamber. That jump-started negotiations between Congress and the White House, but the deadline came and went without a deal.

The shutdown has been playing out against the backdrop of turmoil in the stock market.

Kevin Hassett, the chairman of the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers, said the shutdown does not change the administration’s expectation for strong growth heading into 2019. He told reporters a shutdown of a few weeks is not going to have any “significant effect on the outlook.”

Among those affected by the shutdown — the third of 2018 — are the departments of Homeland Security, Transportation, Interior, Agriculture, State and Justice. Those being furloughed include 52,000 workers at the Internal Revenue Service and nearly everyone at NASA. About 8 in 10 employees of the National Park Service are staying home, and many parks have closed.

The shutdown didn’t stop people from visiting the White Sands National Monument in southern New Mexico, where hundreds of unauthorized visitors have in recent days climbed over a fence to enter the monument, according to The Alamogordo Daily News. State highway workers were sent to the area Monday to erect “no parking” signs along U.S. 70 outside the monument.

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The Washington Monument is reflected in a window of a closed information station serving the World War II Memorial, Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The Washington Monument is reflected in a window of a closed information station serving the World War II Memorial, Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
People visit the Capitol as a shutdown affecting parts of the federal government appeared no closer to ending, with President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats locked in a hardening standoff over border wall money, in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
People visit the Capitol as a shutdown affecting parts of the federal government appeared no closer to ending, with President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats locked in a hardening standoff over border wall money, in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
A driver enters the parking area at Mount Rushmore National Memorial near Keystone, S.D., on Wednesday, Dec. (Ryan Hermens/Rapid City Journal via AP)
A driver enters the parking area at Mount Rushmore National Memorial near Keystone, S.D., on Wednesday, Dec. (Ryan Hermens/Rapid City Journal via AP)
The tiny Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Seattle's historic Pioneer Square neighborhood is posted with a closed sign as part of the federal government shutdown Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
The tiny Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square neighborhood is posted with a closed sign as part of the federal government shutdown Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
REI Co-op customers stand near an unstaffed ranger station kiosk, closed as part of the federal government shutdown, inside the flagship store Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
REI Co-op customers stand near an unstaffed ranger station kiosk, closed as part of the federal government shutdown, inside the flagship store Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Nestor Marquez prepares to throw a snowball during a snowball fight with his children, from right, Jocelynn, 15, and Jon, 11, and family friend Anthony Zahn, left, 11, all of Chicago, at Mount Rushmore National Memorial near Keystone, S. (Ryan Hermens/Rapid City Journal via AP)
Nestor Marquez prepares to throw a snowball during a snowball fight with his children, from right, Jocelynn, 15, and Jon, 11, and family friend Anthony Zahn, left, 11, all of Chicago, at Mount Rushmore National Memorial near Keystone, S. (Ryan Hermens/Rapid City Journal via AP)
People walk near the Washington Monument, with the U.S. Capitol in the background, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018, as the partial government shutdown continues in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
People walk near the Washington Monument, with the U.S. Capitol in the background, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018, as the partial government shutdown continues in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
FILE - In this September 2012 file photo, a cloud hovers over Mount Rainier at sunset in a view from Klapatche Park Camp at Mount Rainier National Park, Wash. (Drew Perine/The News Tribune via AP, File)
FILE – In this September 2012 file photo, a cloud hovers over Mount Rainier at sunset in a view from Klapatche Park Camp at Mount Rainier National Park, Wash. (Drew Perine/The News Tribune via AP, File)
FILE - In this file photo taken June 19, 2013, Mount Rainier is seen from a helicopter flying south of the mountain and west of Yakima, Wash. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
FILE – In this file photo taken June 19, 2013, Mount Rainier is seen from a helicopter flying south of the mountain and west of Yakima, Wash. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
FILE - In this January 2006 file photo, the sun rises over Crater Lake, Ore. Access to Crater Lake and other national parks will be limited due to the government shutdown. (Marc Adamus/The Register-Guard via AP, File)
FILE – In this January 2006 file photo, the sun rises over Crater Lake, Ore. Access to Crater Lake and other national parks will be limited due to the government shutdown. (Marc Adamus/The Register-Guard via AP, File)

Source: The Associated Press