A group of President Donald Trump supporters, driving trucks adorned with Trump flags surrounded the Biden campaign bus in Texas on Friday, Oct. 30.

The Biden campaign claimed that the bus was surrounded by cars, which tried to “stop the bus” on Interstate 35 and “run it off the road,” as it was en rout to Austin from San Antonio. The campaign’s events were then cancelled “out of an abundance of caution,” according to The Hill. 

“Rather than engage in productive conversation about the drastically different visions that Joe Biden and Donald Trump have for our country, Trump supporters in Texas today instead decided to put our staff, surrogates, supporters, and others in harm’s way,” said Tariq Thowfeek, the Biden campaign’s communications director in Texas. 

There was no major incident reported except for one minor collision which led some Democrats and left-wing media to accuse the president’s supporters of trying to intimidate Biden voters.

“They ran into a person’s car, yelling curse words and threats. Don’t let bullies win, vote,” Katie Naranjo, chair of the Travis County Democratic Party said.

A video posted on Twitter showed a white car with a supporter of Joe Biden hit a black truck, trying to drive it away from the bus.

“Insurance adjuster. White car aggressive driving. Vacates lane, moves back into occupied lane. Don’t know what the white car was doing?” an Insurance adjustor observed the incident.

Naomi Narvaiz, a Texas Republican Party official in San Marcos, said Trump supporters decided to show support for the president after learning of the Biden campaign bus’s movements. 

“I didn’t see anyone being overly aggressive,” she told Texas Tribune.

“We don’t want any of the values or policies that the Democratic Party is embracing,” she said. “We don’t want any of those in Texas.”

The FBI is investigating the incident, according to Tribune. 

President Trump made reference to the bus, saying, “I LOVE TEXAS!’

Biden has become increasingly frustrated as Trump supporters swarmed his drive-in rallies in Pennsylvania and Minnesota. He called them “ugly folks” and “chumps.”