The Latest on the congressional response to the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi (all times local):

2:20 p.m.

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell have introduced a resolution rebuking Saudi Arabia for the slaying of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi (jah-MAHL’ khahr-SHOHK’-jee).

The Senate could vote on the resolution as soon as Thursday, after considering a separate resolution that would recommend pulling U.S. aid from a Saudi-led war in Yemen.

The resolution states that the Senate “believes Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is responsible for the murder of Jamal Khashoggi” and calls for the Saudi Arabian government to “ensure appropriate accountability” for those responsible.

The resolution also calls the war in Yemen a “humanitarian crisis” and demands that all parties seek an immediate cease-fire.

CIA Director Gina Haspel leaves the Capitol after giving a classified briefing to the House leadership about the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi and the involvement by the Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
CIA Director Gina Haspel leaves the Capitol after giving a classified briefing to the House leadership about the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi and the involvement by the Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

It is unclear whether the House would vote on the resolution if it passes the Senate.

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12:45 a.m.

Senators are expected to vote on a resolution that would call on the U.S. to pull assistance from the Saudi-led war in Yemen, a measure that would rebuke Saudi Arabia after the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi (jah-MAHL’ khahr-SHOHK’-jee).

The Senate may also consider a separate resolution condemning the journalist’s killing as senators have wrestled with how to respond to the Saudi journalist’s murder. U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman must have at least known of the plot, but President Donald Trump has been reluctant to pin the blame.

Senators voted 60-39 on Wednesday to open debate on the Yemen resolution, signaling there’s enough support to win the 50 votes needed. But it’s unclear how amendments could affect a final vote expected to come Thursday.

Source: The Associated Press

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