The government of Spain launched a campaign to combat racism, but paradoxically the action itself turned out to be racist and received criticism from all sectors. The unfortunate campaign issued postage stamps with different values depending on their darker or lighter shade, seeking to raise awareness of the alleged discrimination against the black race. There was so much criticism that three days after the launch, it had to be canceled.

Spain’s state postal service has been accused of using a counterproductive approach to equality after issuing a series of supposedly anti-racist stamps in skin tones. The lighter-colored stamps being worth more than twice as much as the darker one, The Guardian reported.

Correos España published the four so-called “equality stamps” on Tuesday: a pale one for $1.95 (€1.60), a slightly darker $1.83 (€1.50), a brown one for $0.98 (€0.80) and a black one for $0.85 (€0.70). 

The postal service reported that the initiative was developed in collaboration with the national federation SOS Racism to commemorate the first anniversary of the death of George Floyd, seeking to “highlight the inequalities.” However, the results were confusing and even opposite.

To clarify the situation, the Postal Service posted in a tweet: 

At Correos we believe that the value of a person should not have any color, that’s why we launched Equality Stamps, a collection of stamps in which the darker the color of the stamp, the lower its value. That is a reflection of a painful and unfair reality that should not exist.”

Many are calling the anti-racist campaign very racist.

Antumi Toasijé, a renowned historian and activist in Spain, said that the campaign should end altogether on his personal Twitter account.

“A campaign that outrages those it claims to defend is always a mistake,” Toasijé tweeted.

Moha Gerehou, a Spanish author and former president of SOS Racismo Madrid, told the Associated Press that the stamps were “an insurmountable contradiction,” adding, “At the end of the day, a campaign against racism has issued a clearly racist message.” 

There is no doubt that the message conveyed by the Postal Service is, at the very least, contradictory. Gerehou shares this position and asserts: “A campaign that, in order to show the equal value of our lives, puts into circulation stamps with an unequal value according to color. The message is an absolute disaster. It is racist. There is not much more to add.”

The online response was overwhelmingly negative. Thousands of Twitter users have criticized the campaign since its launch, calling it useless or “accidentally racist.” Many users were surprised that a government-run service would endorse such a product.

There was so much criticism of the campaign that just three days after its launch, Spain’s Postal Service decided to end it, CNN reported.

Sales of the stamps ended Friday morning, a Correos spokesman told CNN, adding that the postal service “will not comment” on the criticism the campaign received.

When asked about whether the cancellation of the campaign was in response to the enormous amount of criticism, the spokesman defended himself by saying that it was not the case and that “Correos is an anti-racist company.”

This incident is yet another example of anti-racist movements, usually driven by the globalist left, with weak arguments to justify their accusations and promote their policies that ultimately generate an effect of further fragmentation and increasing resentment and social hatred.