A report from AP has revealed a series of sexual abuses perpetrated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its mission to combat Ebola in Congo during 2018 and 2019. The WHO sponsors worldwide expressed their great concern about what happened, especially since WHO’s top brass would have tried to cover up the scandal, according to AP News 

According to the allegations analyzed by AP News, one of the accused doctors conditioned employment in the WHO mission on sexual favors, a demand difficult to refuse for the impoverished residents of the Congo region. 

Another accused allegedly impregnated a local girl and is accused of paying her in exchange for her silence. AP had access to a notarized contract revealing that a WHO staff member and a WHO manager signed as witnesses to the hush agreement to “protect the integrity and reputation” of their organization. 

The WHO doctors at the center of the scandal are Boubacar Diallo and Jean-Paul Ngandu. Both denied the facts. It is even more outrageous that the extensive investigation, which included dozens of interviews, emails, legal documents, and recorded meetings, showed that the WHO senior management ignored complaints about both men.

The woman who accused Diallo of demanding sex in exchange for employment claimed that he “often bragged about his connections to WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.”

In addition to condemning the aberrant actions perpetrated by the accused, the investigation strongly criticizes the organization for its lax way of investigating and taking effective action on the matter.

Even “Eight top officials privately acknowledged that WHO had failed to effectively tackle sexual exploitation during the Ebola outbreak and that the problem was systemic, recordings of internal meetings show,” the investigative report stated.

The report condemns the WHO for its cursory investigation of abuse allegations and even accuses senior managers of instructing whistleblowers not to make public reports about what happened.

The AP faulted the WHO for conducting a cursory investigation of abuse allegations, failing to observe its own protocols for handling abuse charges, instructing whistleblowers to keep quiet, and not interviewing any of the accusers.

Some of the WHO officials who spoke to AP reporters were not at all surprised by the Congo allegations and even assumed that the organization has widespread problems with sexual abuse issues.

In the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe, WHO diplomats and donors expressed grave concern about the allegations revealed and demanded an immediate investigation by authorities.

“What is alarming is that WHO seems to be keeping quiet about this abuse and not publicly condemning these allegations. There is a lot of talk about giving WHO more money, but I don’t think any government should commit to that until we know it is an organization we can trust,” warned London School of Economics assistant professor Clare Wenham.

The British ambassador to the United Nations, Simon Manley, was also extremely concerned about the matter and even warned that the “UK has zero tolerance when it comes to sexual exploitation and harassment,” so prompt action against the WHO is expected.

As is well known, the WHO is not the only organization within the United Nations to face sexual scandals of this type. Both the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and UNICEF have also been accused of abusing women in the Democratic Republic of Congo during the Ebola outbreak, as Breitbart opportunely reported.