Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C,) said Thursday, Nov. 12, that Democratic nominee Joe Biden should receive intelligence briefings as part of a transition to power. 

“Yeah, I think he should,” Graham said when asked whether Biden should get the briefings on CNN.

Graham’s comments came after Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) demanded on Wednesday that Biden be allowed to receive classified reports, saying that he is prepared to “step in” if  Biden is not being briefed by Friday. 

Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) along with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and others said that they were against the move. 

“He’s not president right now,” McCarthy said, according to Newsweek. “Don’t know if he’ll be president January 20, but whoever is will get the information.”

Though the 2020 election results remain undecided, several mainstream media outlets have declared Biden the winner in the race against President Donald Trump.

Amid allegations of irregularities and voting fraud, the Trump campaign has filed lawsuits in many swing states to fight for the integrity of the election. 

Both Graham and Lankford have expressed support of President Trump’s legal actions.

Graham has donated $500,000 to the Trump team’s legal defense fund and said that Democrats don’t care about election laws as long as their candidate wins. 

“Democrats could give a damn about this, they don’t care how Trump lost as long as he lost,” he said. “Let’s fight back and give President Trump all the due process the law allows him.”

Lankford also made clear that he believed President Trump “is fully in his right to ask for recounts and for every legal questions to be fully vetted and resolved.”

“It is important for the 71 million Americans that voted for President Trump that at the end of all this their questions are answered,” Lankford wrote.

President Trump won a lawsuit in Pennsylvania Thursday barring the state from counting ballots where the voters needed to provide proof of identification and failed to do so by Nov. 9.