President Donald Trump has sent a new message of disappointment to Republican Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp by suggesting Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) run for the state’s governor position to replace the incumbent.

During his rally campaigning for Georgia Republican Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue on Saturday, Dec. 5, the president floated the idea of supporting Collins for the governor seat.

“Doug, [do] you want to run for governor in two years?” President Trump raised the question at the rally.

“He’d be a good looking governor,” the president spoke to the crowd who erupted in cheers and applause.

President Trump said that Collins and Loeffler had “a great primary, a very strong primary,” and “they both did fantastically well.”

“He is on board and he is one of the greatest advocates I’ve ever met in Washington,” the president said. “I want to thank Doug. Thank you. What a job he does.”

Collins is known as a loyal supporter of President Trump as he fought back Democrats’ during their impeachment attempts against the president. 

The Trump campaign shared footage showing President Trump encouraging Collins to run for the governor position and forwarded the message to Kemp.

According to a lawsuit filed by attorney Sydney Powell, Kemp is accused of having “rushed through the purchase of the Dominion voting machines and software in 2019 for the 2020 Presidential Election” without due diligence and disregarded safety concerns. The machines are alleged to have secret “ballot stuffing” algorithms and can be accessed by the Chinese Communist Party and Iranian agents to meddle in the election.

President Trump on Saturday, Dec. 5, reportedly urged Kemp to call a special session of the Legislature to overturn the 2020 election results, which was allegedly rigged for Democratic nominee Joe Biden. The president also asked the governor to demand an audit of absentee ballot signatures.

However, Kemp said late on Sunday that he would not call such a special session despite growing evidence of election irregularities and potential fraud.