President Donald Trump read from a prayer delivered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as he joined other world leaders and veterans Wednesday in marking the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

Roosevelt went on national radio on June 6, 1944, to address the United States for the first time about the Normandy invasion. Trump, with images of an American flag and Roosevelt projected behind him, read to the crowd, “Almighty God, our sons, pride of our nation, this day, have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion and our civilization and to set free a suffering humanity.”

The president shared on Fanpage, “It was my honor to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s powerful prayer in Portsmouth, England today.”

President Trump traveled to the southern coast of England Wednesday to pay respects to American servicemen and servicewomen and allies who helped rescue Europe from Nazi Germany. He sat in a VIP area with other world leaders and in between Queen Elizabeth II and First Lady Melania Trump during the program, which focused on a telling of events leading up to D-Day. Some 300 World War II veterans also attended the seaside ceremony.

President Trump joined in giving a standing ovation to a group of World War II vets who appeared on stage as the commemoration began.

“Almighty God, our sons, pride of our nation, this day, have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion and our civilization and to set free a suffering humanity,” the president read.

After the event, Trump visited with American World War II veterans who were among Allied troops on D-Day. He had lunch and met briefly with German Chancellor Angela Merkel before heading to Ireland for an airport meeting with Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and to stay at his golf course in the village of Doonbeg, his first visit to the country as president. Varadkar greeted Trump on the tarmac before they went into their meeting inside the airport terminal.

Trump and Merkel discussed Libya and conditions in West Africa during their roughly 10-minute meeting, the White House said.

During a news conference Tuesday in London, Trump said he is grateful for the warm welcome he received from the British royal family and prime minister. Trump emphasized a longstanding bond between the U.S. and Britain, noting that more than 1.5 million Americans were stationed in England in advance of the invasion.

Britain
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth and U.S President Donald Trump look on during commemorations for the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day landings at Southsea Common, Portsmouth, England, on June 5, 2019. (Chris Jackson/Pool Photo via AP)
French President Emmanuel Macron, left, British Prime Minister Theresa May, Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth II, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, watch a flyover at the conclusion of a ceremony to mark the 75th Anniversary of D-Day, when the Allied soldiers, sailors and airmen conducted an invasion that helped liberate Europe from Nazi Germany, Wednesday, June 5, 2019, in Portsmouth, England. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
French President Emmanuel Macron, left, British Prime Minister Theresa May, Prince Charles, Queen Elizabeth II, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, watch a flyover at the conclusion of a ceremony to mark the 75th Anniversary of D-Day, when the Allied soldiers, sailors and airmen conducted an invasion that helped liberate Europe from Nazi Germany, Wednesday, June 5, 2019, in Portsmouth, England. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)