A controversial Iranian general would still be alive today if a Democrat was in the Oval Office.

Three Democratic candidates for president confirmed they would not order a deadly military strike on Gen. Qassem Soleimani if they could decide whether to save lives by killing the top terrorist leader on Jan. 3.

Pete Buttigieg admitted he knew Soleimani had a history of “murder and mayhem” but still would not have ordered the strike if he was president.

“Look, I feel very strongly about the campaign of murder and mayhem that Gen. Soleimani and his units have perpetrated,” the former South Bend mayor said on a video of the ABC News Democratic debate uploaded to Twitter. “It is also the case that if we have learned nothing else from the war in Iraq, it is that taking out a bad guy is not a good idea if you do not know what you are doing.”

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) suggested he knew the general had committed acts of terrorism but feared a military strike would bring retaliation from Iran.

“You cannot go around saying, ‘You are a bad guy, we are going to assassinate you,’” he said on a video of the debate posted to Twitter. “If that happens, you are opening the door to international anarchy that every government in the world will then be subjected to attacks and assassination.”

Joe Biden dismissed previous reports about Soleimani’s involvement in terrorist attacks for not having enough evidence.

“The reason I would not have ordered the strike is there is no evidence yet of imminent threat that was going to come from him,” the former vice president said on another video of the debate posted to Twitter.

Rep. Mike Kelly (R-Pa.) recently accused the Democratic Party of trying to stop President Donald Trump from ordering military strikes because his leadership is “too damn strong.”

“Please do not tell me this is about taking away the authorization for military force, this is about taking away the strongest president we ever had,” he said on a video uploaded by Fox News. “We stand in the people’s House and we are worried more about the laws of election of 2020 than the laws of American lives and the continued loss of lives around the world by one of the worst terrorists of all time.”

Kelly recalled many years ago when Congress lamented not taking action sooner against al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden who took responsibility for terrorist attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center in New York, on Sept. 11, 2001.

“We stood together as the United States and said this was the right thing to do, at the right time because it would save lives,” he said. “We delayed because we were not sure. I thought back at what [former] President Obama would say and he said, ‘I made this decision on my own.’”

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