President Donald J. Trump pledged this week to begin the deportation of millions of illegal aliens this week, as over 1 million deportation orders have built up at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, awaiting enforcement.

The president tweeted the mandate on Monday, June 17, while also praising Mexico’s strong immigration laws.

“Next week ICE will begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States. They will be removed as fast as they come in. ” the president wrote on Twitter.


“Mexico, using their strong immigration laws, is doing a very good job of stopping people … long before they get to our Southern Border. Guatemala is getting ready to sign a Safe-Third Agreement,” the tweet continued. “The only ones who won’t do anything are the Democrats in Congress. They must vote to get rid of the loopholes, and fix asylum! If so, Border Crisis will end quickly!”

Since then there has been plenty of critique on whether such an order can be carried out, including doubts as to whether the president’s announcement was in keeping with Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) practice of keeping deportation announcements private until carried out.

However, the very next day, ICE’s acting director confirmed what President Trump claimed in his Monday tweet, that the agency will begin deporting millions of undocumented migrants.

Confirmed

Acting ICE Director Mark Morgan said, they don’t have the resources to deport 11 million people in a short time, “but we have and we remove people every single year. And we’re going to continue to do that,” Morgan told The Hill.

Morgan said in the past ICE avoided prosecution of non-criminal aliens while prioritizing criminals, but they won’t return to that practice as it would send the wrong message to illegal immigrants that they “will never be touched.”

Moreover, Morgan mirrored President Trump’s belief that Congress is to blame for immigration system woes.

“You have lawmakers saying how horrible ICE is and how it needs to be abolished. And you have other NGOs [non-governmental organizations] that are saying the same thing, that makes it really challenging for a law enforcement organization to do that,” said Morgan.

He is referring to members of Congress who are not in support of further funding for ICE and the U.S. Border Patrol, two agencies of several that struggle to meet the demand of incoming illegal immigrants and asylum seekers. while trying to detain and deport criminal illegals, and catch human and drug smugglers.