With an unusual 7-point lead, President Donald Trump is well ahead of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in Iowa.

The poll conducted by Des Moines Register/Mediacom, between Oct. 26 and Oct. 29, shows President Trump the favorite at 48% and 41% for candidate Biden, reported Des Moines Register on Oct. 31. 

Moreover, 5 percent of those polled did not want to reveal the name of their favorite candidate, which could include even more voters for President Trump, as part of the ‘silent’ supporters who prefer deeds to words.

Already in September the two candidates were tied at 47 percent, but now the difference is far from a technical tie or margin of error and is clearly defined by the re-election.

Ann Selzer, president of Selzer & Co., which provides research and public opinion services, explained predominant aspects of the survey, in particular comparing it to what happened in the 2016 campaign. 

“The president is holding demographic groups that he won in Iowa four years ago, and that would give someone a certain level of comfort with their standing,” she said.

She added, “There’s a consistent story in 2020 to what happened in 2016.”

She also warned that those results could change even more, given that none of the candidates were getting 50 percent.

In addition, she attributed the difference between the September results and the current one to independent voters, now leaning toward President Trump.

Among other results, the poll indicated that 51% of voters had already voted.

It also highlighted the fact that among those who have not yet voted, President Trump leads 64 percent versus 28 percent for Biden. Among those who have already voted, Biden leads 55 percent versus 32 percent for Trump. 

Many of President Trump’s voters prioritize the economy and taxes, and he has worked hard in both areas. 

Iowa restored about 60 percent of the jobs lost to the impact of the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) pandemic, and the unemployment rate is 4.6% one of the lowest in the country. 

The results of the polls have been very controversial in this election campaign, and do not seem to correspond with what was observed in the candidates’ campaigns.

 President Trump’s public gatherings are massive, reminiscent of rock concerts, and overflowing with enthusiasm, while Biden’s are attended by only a few dozen not-so-expressive people. 

Two of the analysts who predicted President Trump’s unexpected victory in 2016, agree that this time he will also get it mainly because of the vote of the silent majority, reluctant to say their preferences, as Selzer observed in Iowa this time.  

Silent voters do not respond to polls as expected, nor do they attend large public demonstrations; others are engaged in work that takes them away from those in the population centers as seems to be the case with these power grid workers.   

Ivanka Trump presented a photo of some specialists in electrical networks deploying their support to Trump, in the middle of their work in the countryside. 

“This is amazing! Linemen for Trump,” she wrote.