In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to “save thousands of innocents from death.”

Within months, the image of dead U.S. soldiers dragged through the streets of Mogadishu profoundly changed the way the U.S. approached Africa. And yet it is barely mentioned in the explorations of Bush’s legacy since his death.

The Somalia mission was promoted as an act of charity, meant to protect starving Somalis from the attacks and looting that kept them from reaching aid in a country torn by warlord-led fighting after the fall of dictator of Siad Barre. The United Nations has estimated 300,000 people died.

“You’re doing God’s work,” Bush said as he ended his live address from the White House. “We will not fail.”

FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 1, 1993 file photo, U.S. President George H.W. Bush greets Somali children applauding him during a visit to an orphanage in famine-ravaged Baidoa, Somalia on a two-day visit to review Operation Restore Hope. In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to
FILE – In this Friday, Jan. 1, 1993 file photo, U.S. President George H.W. Bush greets Somali children applauding him during a visit to an orphanage in famine-ravaged Baidoa, Somalia on a two-day visit to review Operation Restore Hope. In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to “save thousands of innocents from death.” (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

Cheering Somalis greeted the first U.S. troops as they arrived to lead a United Nations operation. And Bush became the first, and only, U.S. president to visit the drought-plagued Horn of Africa nation.

A month after ordering in the troops, he shared a modest New Year’s meal with dozens of soldiers and Marines and told them the American people were fully behind them in the mission to help Somalis, called Operation Restore Hope.

“Thanks to you, they got a shot. They got a shot at really living,” Stars and Stripes reported him saying.

These days, a visit to Somalia by an American president, wearing desert fatigues and dutifully eating the soldiers’ meal of “Menu No. 8: Ham slice with Accessory Packet A,” is now almost unthinkable.

FILE - In this Oct. 19, 1993 file photo, a group of young Somalis chant anti-American slogans while sitting atop the burned out hulk of a U.S. Black Hawk helicopter, shot down during a firefight with Somali guerrillas, in Mogadishu, Somalia. In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to
FILE – In this Oct. 19, 1993 file photo, a group of young Somalis chant anti-American slogans while sitting atop the burned out hulk of a U.S. Black Hawk helicopter, shot down during a firefight with Somali guerrillas, in Mogadishu, Somalia. In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to “save thousands of innocents from death.” (AP Photo/Dominique Mollard, File)

As the humanitarian crisis eased, rebuilding Somalia became the goal, but it stumbled. The end came in October 1993 when an elite U.S. raid in Mogadishu against a key warlord descended into street battles. Hundreds of Somalis were killed. Two U.S. Black Hawk helicopters were shot down, and 18 Americans were killed. As global outrage echoed, the U.S. pulled out of Somalia five months later amid accusations that they had swept in well-intentioned but unprepared.

A quarter-century later, Somalia’s fragile central government is still trying to take hold. It wrestles with widespread corruption, bitter relations with regional states and high-profile attacks by the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab — and now a new threat from fighters linked to the Islamic State organization.

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 10, 1992 file photo, Somalis walk on a street in Mogadishu, Somalia that divides the capital between north and south and fighting clans in what is known as the Green Line. In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to
FILE – In this Thursday, Dec. 10, 1992 file photo, Somalis walk on a street in Mogadishu, Somalia that divides the capital between north and south and fighting clans in what is known as the Green Line. In the final days of his presidency, George H.W. Bush committed the U.S. military to a mission many would later regret, ordering more than 20,000 troops into Somalia to “save thousands of innocents from death.” (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

The country’s Somali-American president, Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed, avoided discussions of the past when he released a brief statement early Sunday expressing “heartfelt condolences.”

Bush, he tweeted, “was a true statesman who was committed to world peace and upholding democracy.”

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Source: The Associated Press