With the 2020 presidential debate less than a month away, speculation on whether President Donald Trump will be partaking in the debate amid looming liberal favoritism and bias is also becoming a popular question among observers.

Frank Fahrenkopf, former Republican National Committee chairman and co-founder of the Commission on Presidential Debates, said that he is on the lookout for an impartial moderator for the 2020 presidential debate, Politico reports.

“We’re looking for that person who is as unbiased as possible, will do a fair job, and be a facilitator,” Fahrenkopf said, insisting that the commission will seek moderators who are “not biased one way or the other.”

Fahrenkopf noted that in the selection of moderators, the commission—made up of experienced board members who specialize in moderating—bases its decision on an “individual journalist’s body of work rather than focus on where they’re employed,” Politico reported.

The former RNC chairman also noted that “there’s always criticism” of chosen moderators, where two instances in his experience of more than 30 years moderators “inserted themselves when they shouldn’t,” but said he believes the vast majority have been fair.

Hugh Hewitt, conservative radio host and contributor for the Washington Post, suggested in a recent column that Trump should “quickly dismiss” the three 2020 presidential debates as “unacceptable.”

“President Trump should quickly dismiss that schedule as unacceptable and announce that any debates may not be held at all in 2020, it will be only after extensive, direct negotiations between him and the eventual nominee of the Democratic Party and their respective designated representatives,” Hewitt wrote. “And those negotiations should begin from a premise that the Republicans will no longer play by the biased rules of a deeply unbalanced Manhattan-Beltway media elite.”

According to a September Gallup survey, the Americans’ trust in mass media has been reported to be at an “all-time low” of 41 percent, where merely 13 percent trust the media “a great deal” and 28 percent “a fair amount. Sixty-nine percent of Democrats are reported to be trusting of the media, whereas only 15 percent of Republicans and 36 percent of Independents feel the same way.

Hewitt also cited the Gallup survey results in his explanation of why Trump denounced big media as “fake news.” Hewitt explained in writing that the mainstream media’s “alleged ‘lies’ by the president are routine and routinely ignored or dismissed” amid a “sham impeachment” inquiry that “resulted in an avalanche of bias.”

Hewitt suggested that Trump must first take “a wrecking ball” before presidential debates can be restored to serious exercises in which “crucial differences between the two major-party candidates” may be assessed, but has faith that he is able to do so.

“There are plenty of alternatives, and the best would involve open access and genuinely smart, diverse questioners who are not rehearsed to seek conflict, headlines, or ratings,” Hewitt wrote. “A lesser dose of media celebrity is a higher dose of fairness to the voters.”