A New South Wales citizen posted a video of a frightening encounter, which has been watched hundreds of thousands of times. Residents could be excused for thinking they are taking part in a Hitchcock thriller as soon as they step outdoors.

Corellas, a type of cockatoo, are native to the NSW Shoalhaven region of Australia and appear to prefer one particular area at the moment. They have taken over and dominate the landscape.

Bird enthusiasts would probably rejoice at the sight of so many flying birds in one location, but the influx frightens people.

The species is noted for its aggressive behavior, and the amount of bird poop would be astounding.

Residents have little control over the bird apocalypse because they are a protected species.

People have compared it to a scene from Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds” or joked that there are many kids on that street waiting for their letter from Hogwarts.

While many people think it’s awesome. Others believe it is an example of what can happen when land is cleared to make room for a new housing estate.

However, there may be a much more dreadful explanation for so many birds in an unusual place.

According to Professor Gisella Kaplan, Corellas aren’t notorious for traveling in large groups unless their old homes have become unlivable.

“Corellas prefer to move in small flocks of 20 or 30, but what we have seen in the last [few] years in Western Australia and South Australia and occasionally in Sydney, is enormous flocks of thousands, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that their numbers have increased. 

“It can mean that they have all fled from somewhere and flocked together … in most cases, it happens when there is a dire shortage of food and water or the heat gets so bad they have to flee,” she said.

“We need to help them survive because in some cases it could be that the huge flock may be the sum total of all the birds that exist in that state and that entire huge region,” she added.

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