New developments in the search for Noah’s Ark have experts optimistic that we will soon have definitive evidence that Noah’s Ark is buried in Turkey.

In 1959, expert cartographer Capt. İlhan Durupınar discovered an unusual formation in the mountains of Eastern Turkey that resembles a massive ship. For 60 years scientists and the faithful have theorized that this is the iconic location of the landing of Noah’s Ark, a notion that has ignited debate in both scientific and religious communities.

In 2017, filmmaker Cem Sertesen released the documentary “Noah’s Ark,” which brought together 22 years of research into the region where many believe the great biblical ship rests. Now, Sertesen is planning a sequel, “Noah’s Ark-2,” which will focus on new developments in the investigation of this secluded mountain range.

Recently, computer engineer and archaeologist Andrew Jones and geophysicist John Larsen have made a study of the location, utilizing 3D imaging technology to scan under the ground. While the photos have yet to be released—as they will be with the release of the second documentary—the parties involved appear to be convinced that we are closer than ever to realizing this piece of our cultural history.

In the Book of Genesis, the mountains of Ararat in what is now eastern Turkey is the region in which Noah’s Ark came to rest after the Great Flood. (Pixabay)

Sertesen clarified that the images were taken by transmitting electrical signals through cables they placed underground around the area. He emphasized that there is nothing fabricated in their 3D imaging and that the results they will present are undoctored photos of what is really below the earth.

“These are the actual images of Noah’s Ark,” said Sertesen, who previously released a documentary about finding the ark in 2017.

“They are neither fake nor simulation. They show the entire ship buried underground.”

According to legend, Noah loaded two of every animal onto a 492 feet long ark to save them from apocalyptic flooding.

In the Book of Genesis, the mountains of Ararat in what is now eastern Turkey is the region in which Noah’s Ark came to rest after the Great Flood.

The release of the new documentary has yet to be confirmed, but it is possible that they will wait until they’ve had a chance to excavate the area before finishing the film.

Do you believe in the Noah’s Ark story? Let us know in the comments!